Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
rick merritt
User Rank
Blogger
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
rick merritt   10/18/2012 6:39:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Does Andy have it right? wrong? What do you think?

elPresidente
User Rank
Freelancer
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
elPresidente   10/19/2012 8:40:11 PM
NO RATINGS
That "100,000 chips or it ain't worth it" has been the mantra for decades - nothing new. 100Gb/s FPGAs have been around for a couple of years now. Again, nothing new. No mention of 160Gb/s, or 400Gb/s, which are upcoming. Sounds to me like he's trying to solve procurement channel problems in his investment portfolio, vs being a visionary driver of industry.

krh
User Rank
Rookie
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
krh   10/20/2012 4:33:41 AM
NO RATINGS
$$ per bit...Andy has it right for the next 5 years...

rick merritt
User Rank
Blogger
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
rick merritt   10/22/2012 8:39:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Two great and opposing views here. I'd love to hear some more thoughtful opinions on whether Andy has the future of networking right and why or why not.

Philip Papadopoulos
User Rank
Rookie
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
Philip Papadopoulos   10/26/2012 9:36:33 PM
NO RATINGS
1) Andy's talking about the server space. I think he's bang on. The adoption curves look to be very similar to past networking tech uptakes. 2) He's not talking about the desktop space and/or wireless space. GigE is now pressed down on el-cheapo DIY motherboards, but you don't really need greater than 1GbE in your house for the next 1/2 decade) Hence, you cannot necessarily make the same volume argument for bringing down the price of 10GbE at the same rate. That means that the absolute price of 10G won't drop as quickly as it did for 1G, but it will get there. Of that, I have no doubt. Afterall, as people rely on network (buzzword cloud) services, the number of servers continues to rise. And Ideally you keep constant BW/core as you deploy big systems. As core count rises, so do your network bandwidth needs.

Philip Papadopoulos
User Rank
Rookie
re: Bechtolsheim brainstorms on next networking wave
Philip Papadopoulos   10/26/2012 9:43:05 PM
NO RATINGS
There is a fundamental utility limit of the network entering/exiting a server -- that's memory bandwidth. 400Gb/s is 50GB/sec, which is on par with achievable total memory bandwidth of common servers. When your network becomes faster than memory speed, you have to wonder about practical utility of that extra unusable capacity. I would argue that the practical limit is closer to single memory channel speed, not aggregate system memory bandwidth. Today, a 2100MHz DDR3 Channel is 17GB/sec ~ 136Gbps.



Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Engineer's Bookshelf
Caleb Kraft

The Martian: A Delightful Exploration of Math, Mars & Feces
Caleb Kraft
6 comments
To say that Andy Weir's The Martian is an exploration of math, Mars, and feces is a slight simplification. I doubt that the author would have any complaints, though.

The Engineering Life - Around the Web
Caleb Kraft

Surprise TOQ Teardown at EELive!
Caleb Kraft
Post a comment
This year, for EELive! I had a little surprise that I was quite eager to share. Qualcomm had given us a TOQ smart watch in order to award someone a prize. We were given complete freedom to ...

Design Contests & Competitions
Caleb Kraft

Join The Balancing Act With April's Caption Contest
Caleb Kraft
57 comments
Sometimes it can feel like you're really performing in the big tent when presenting your hardware. This month's caption contest exemplifies this wonderfully.

Engineering Investigations
Caleb Kraft

Frankenstein's Fix: The Winners Announced!
Caleb Kraft
8 comments
The Frankenstein's Fix contest for the Tektronix Scope has finally officially come to an end. We had an incredibly amusing live chat earlier today to announce the winners. However, we ...

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)