Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
WKetel   10/30/2012 12:20:50 AM
NO RATINGS
Clearly, EREBUS has asserted that we would be better off without half the population of California. Perhaps that is not his photo.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
WKetel   10/30/2012 12:19:54 AM
NO RATINGS
Clearly, EREBUS has asserted that we would be better off without half the population of California. While it is true that a lot of them seem to have stayed out in the sun way too long, that is a socially and politically incorrect assertion. OH WELL!

agk
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
agk   10/29/2012 10:37:53 AM
NO RATINGS
An extraordinary thinking in the year 1966. Based on this many other novel ideas can be arrived at.

EREBUS0
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
EREBUS0   10/21/2012 10:00:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Enough rain falls every day to supply the worlds need of water for a year. If people are too stupid to live where rain does not fall, I think we are better off without them in the gene pool. There are many ways to conserve and reuse water. The key is to adapt your use to your supply. If you exceed what you have, then you are not paying attention. Just my opinion.

ReneCardenas
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
ReneCardenas   10/21/2012 7:29:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Reads like another perpetual motion machine to me ;-) Nothing is as simple as it seems, putting the temperature concern aside, frozen pure water may offer some benefits, but the problem is that water in its natural form, contains a level of mineral content, that generates all kinds of deposits with time, has anyone had to replace home plumbing, or had to clean up the shower head?, and noticed the mineral deposits built with time. Good intentions but many other methods are been explored, from filtering salt water to better filtration mechanisms at a more local level.

BrianBailey
User Rank
Blogger
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
BrianBailey   10/20/2012 8:04:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Well actually he did. He claims that the energy required is considerable and that because he is using natural forces (gravity, earth spin etc) he would need little to no energy input. However, it seems to be that he assumes the ice balls will not melt plus I think there are a number of other issues with his calculations.

Battar
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: long distance irrigation
Battar   10/20/2012 5:42:17 PM
NO RATINGS
The energy required to transport the water would be better employed in desalination of local water. Didn't think of that, did he?



Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Curiosity Killed the Cat (Just Call Me Mr. Curiosity)
Max Maxfield
23 comments
My wife, Gina The Gorgeous, loves animals. She has two stupid dogs and two stupid cats. How stupid are they? Well, allow me to show you this video of the dogs that I made a couple of years ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
13 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).