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sranje
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
sranje   10/30/2012 6:55:57 PM
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Well done Rick - thank you. An interesting angle, including for Intel, will soon be - a standalone processor versus SoC... With all the accompanying implications - including packaging, multiple die (SiP) packaging, etc., etc.

Duane Benson
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
Duane Benson   10/30/2012 9:05:15 PM
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Once all of the competing CPUs reach a certain point of diminishing returns, the differences that had been so important in years past lose relevance. At that point, things like support of the installed base of software become more important. Still, the typical x86 powered machine is vastly overpowered for the needs of many users, hence the success of tablets. There will always be extreme users, such as gamers, analysts and engineers that will need that additional power. It remains to be seen if ARM vendors will be able make any inroads into that set.

Bert22306
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
Bert22306   10/31/2012 10:22:47 PM
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I'm not a uP designer, but it seems to me that all we are seeing here is more of the same. Did not the x86 essentially become a risc processor back in the original Pentium days, with the complex functions added peripherally? The risc processors (ARM) started to focus more on saving power rather than increasing performance. Can't x86 morph again?

rick merritt
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
rick merritt   11/1/2012 3:05:58 PM
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I suspect a new and very interesting Atom 2.0 must be in the lab at Intel. What should it have inside?

Bert22306
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
Bert22306   11/1/2012 7:27:32 PM
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An ATOM 2.0 with x86 instruction set? That's basically where I'm coming from. Also, Duane, I don't think the x86 is vastly overpowered compared with what the average user needs. The reason being, it is the up-to-date productivity apps such as Office or Adobe Acrobat, never mind the games, that demand the power. It's not that the user is writing CPU-intensive programs. At least, not in most cases.

help.fulguy
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
help.fulguy   11/2/2012 3:55:17 AM
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Rick, you continue to amaze me with your dumbness and stupidity and also, your crappy headlines. You really think $50B revenue generating architecture is dead! I guess you got a new doze of ARM Juice from the ARMTimes sponsored conference. You have no clue and cant believe UBM has bozos like you writing articles. You bring shame to EE that he has to read your article

rick merritt
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
rick merritt   11/2/2012 6:34:32 AM
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Thanks for your passion ;-)

Kinnar
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
Kinnar   11/4/2012 7:12:21 PM
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It is quite right that technology never dies, and the x86 is that much penetrated in the computing environment it will go on getting used on the consumer PCs, Yes it may happen that Intel will have to reduce the prices of their processor compared to at what price they are selling present days.

wsw1982
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
wsw1982   11/4/2012 8:04:28 PM
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The ARM is not necessary power efficient then x86. I think people just over believed in arm, and kind of thinking, anything from arm must be low power processor. The newest Atom "medfield" is actually comparable with newest ARM "krait" in power efficiency (if not better than ARM). The almost identical design motorola Raza i and m, are compatible at real life usage, yet the power consumption of atom is much lower than the krait. Consider this, that the atom is 5 years old architecture on a 32 nm silicon node, the krait is like 1 year old on a 28 nm silicon. I really don't know why most people still has so many confident in arm about "low power". The ARM a15 from Samsung, is considerable faster than the medfield, but it's a competition between 5+ w soc and 1+ w soc.I am wander why both apple and qualcomm use their own arm design, if the a15 is really as good as arm declared. Reminder me just the declaration of ARM last year that "the x86 is impossible for mobilephone", "the x86 is much more power hungry than arm". which lead me to further concern their reputation.

kenny.g
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re: The x86 is dead. Long live the x86
kenny.g   11/5/2012 2:54:37 AM
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Medfield is a single core processor while the latest ARM Qualcomm Snapdragon S4 pro has able to pack 4 cores into it. all i can say intel is just starting to dip their toe in the water.

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