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mhrackin
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CEO
re: Hello? Itís Marty. Can you hear me?
mhrackin   12/11/2012 7:55:01 PM
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It's good to see Marty still around and involved. Back in 1970, I worked in the Motorola Research Labs in the brand-new Schaumburg facility. I did have a (very) small part in the story: I had worked on making inexpensive plastic transistors (originally intended for fast switching) work as low-noise VHF/UHF signal amps. I was assigned to be a consultant to Marty's project to share my results and help make the early prototypes work with mass-produced silicon instead of the (20x more expensive)ones then favored. Mark Rackin, W4LGN (back in ancient times, K2UWN, then W9JZY)

Bobgh
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Rookie
re: Hello? Itís Marty. Can you hear me?
Bobgh   11/28/2012 2:25:01 AM
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In recent months, I have seen several accounts in the press discussing Martin Cooper's role in the development of the cell phone. I worked for Martin at Motorola Communications and Industrial Electronics (C&IE) from November 1959 to June 1960. Motorola was developing the latest in a series of two way radio products of ever smaller size. These developments were part of an evolutionary process that led eventually to the cell phone. I was fresh out of school and my contributions were of no particular significance. But let me tell you about something I observed on a daily basis at Motorola's plant in Chicago. Motorola C&IE had two black employees. They tended an incinerator on the opposite side of the parking lot from the plant. They were not allowed into the building. Not to take a break or eat lunch. Not to use the rest rooms. Not to warm up in the middle of Chicago's sub zero winters. And my fellow employees would take their breaks at the second floor windows overlooking that parking lot, and they would make insulting, racist comments about the two black employees. I went to human relations, and in the most non-confrontational way that I could muster I asked why Motorola did not employ on the basis of ability, without regard to race. And at my six month review, I was terminated. You don't have to take my word concerning Motorola's employment policies. In September of 1980, Motorola agreed to pay up to $10 million in back pay to some 11,000 blacks who were denied jobs over a seven-year period and to institute a $5 million affirmative action program, according to the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. I have a question for Martin Cooper. Marty, what did you ever do to challenge the blatant, toxic racial discrimination at Motorola? Robert Gilchrist Huenemann, M.S.E.E. 120 Harbern Way Hollister, CA 95023-9708 831-635-0786 bobgh@razzolink.com https://sites.google.com/site/bobhuenemann/ Extra Class Amateur Radio License W6RFW

Bobgh
User Rank
Rookie
re: Hello? Itís Marty. Can you hear me?
Bobgh   11/28/2012 2:23:32 AM
NO RATINGS
In recent months, I have seen several accounts in the press discussing Martin Cooper's role in the development of the cell phone. I worked for Martin at Motorola Communications and Industrial Electronics (C&IE) from November 1959 to June 1960. Motorola was developing the latest in a series of two way radio products of ever smaller size. These developments were part of an evolutionary process that led eventually to the cell phone. I was fresh out of school and my contributions were of no particular significance. But let me tell you about something I observed on a daily basis at Motorola's plant in Chicago. Motorola C&IE had two black employees. They tended an incinerator on the opposite side of the parking lot from the plant. They were not allowed into the building. Not to take a break or eat lunch. Not to use the rest rooms. Not to warm up in the middle of Chicago's sub zero winters. And my fellow employees would take their breaks at the second floor windows overlooking that parking lot, and they would make insulting, racist comments about the two black employees. I went to human relations, and in the most non-confrontational way that I could muster I asked why Motorola did not employ on the basis of ability, without regard to race. And at my six month review, I was terminated. You don't have to take my word concerning Motorola's employment policies. In September of 1980, Motorola agreed to pay up to $10 million in back pay to some 11,000 blacks who were denied jobs over a seven-year period and to institute a $5 million affirmative action program, according to the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. I have a question for Martin Cooper. Marty, what did you ever do to challenge the blatant, toxic racial discrimination at Motorola? Robert Gilchrist Huenemann, M.S.E.E. 120 Harbern Way Hollister, CA 95023-9708 831-635-0786 bobgh@razzolink.com https://sites.google.com/site/bobhuenemann/ Extra Class Amateur Radio License W6RFW



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