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John_Galt
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
John_Galt   11/28/2012 3:33:48 PM
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@Jack...go easy on our friend chipmonk. For the past 50 years public education here in the States has atrophied the curricula so badly that many "students" couldn't find England on a map. I work with younger BS/MSEEs who cannot even compose a coherent paragraph...they're not stupid, in fact many are quite bright, it's just that the system has failed them.

jackOfManyTrades
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
jackOfManyTrades   11/28/2012 9:02:54 AM
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and my country is not called "England" anymore than the US is called "Texas".

jackOfManyTrades
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
jackOfManyTrades   11/28/2012 9:01:55 AM
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De-industrialised? Uncompetaive? Take a look at this PWC report: http://www.pwc.co.uk/assets/pdf/ukmanufacturing-300309.pdf "There is a widespread assumption that the final demise of manufacturing in the UK is only a matter of time. But this is simply not so. The facts tell a different story: • Output of British manufacturing reached an all-time high in 2007, even adjusted for inflation • The UK is the world’s 6th largest manufacturer with strong positions in certain key industries, e.g. a 15% global market share in Aerospace • UK Manufacturing achieved a 50% increase in labour productivity from 1997-2007"

agk
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
agk   11/28/2012 6:26:01 AM
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The article is interesting to read. It is electronics history. While reading visualize the same and many interesting thoughts comes to my mind. Here the heroes live a student cum professional life.

Kevin Neilson
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
Kevin Neilson   11/28/2012 3:43:44 AM
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The story isn't too clear on this, but Roger Wilson and Sophie Wilson are the same person. The 65C02! What a nice processor.

rick merritt
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
rick merritt   11/27/2012 11:31:45 PM
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Nice telling of a piece of microprocessor history. The lesson, Just say, "Yes!"

TanjB
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
TanjB   11/27/2012 10:42:06 PM
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ARM in early 90s was not so much in advance of other chips, especially MIPS, and MIPS sold a lot more. Hauser forgot one other essential thing he gave ARM: no customers. So when the mobile industry was ready to build SOCs, there was ARM with a suitable chip, fabless portable design, and no other business model to distract them. It was their one lifeline, and it proved to be a bonanza. The dominant competitor capable of providing a choice at the time, MIPS, was very successful elsewhere and by the time phones were big enough business for them to become concerned, ARM had a lock. These days, ARM is part of SOCs with billions of transistors just like x86. The difference is in balance: in the ARM ecosystem the die is shared with IP like GPUs, modems, and half a dozen other blocks which have formed a healthy ecosystem. x86 is elbowing in: will it have more success now than MIPS 15 years ago?

MikeSantarini
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
MikeSantarini   11/27/2012 10:22:11 PM
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Great article, Peter.

rogkru
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
rogkru   11/27/2012 9:13:42 PM
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Was the ferranti ULA a sea-of-gates with a metal top layer - or was it actually an eraly FPGA ? Google found this... chances are google run on thousands of Intel processors.... ironic. http://tinyurl.com/ferranti-ULA-problems-delay

John_Galt
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re: Why the ARM architecture is shaped the way it is
John_Galt   11/27/2012 8:48:24 PM
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Thank goodness for those 10 Billion transistor giants. Want to try running SolidWorks or AnSYS' Maxwell on even the most powerful ARM8 (if they were even available)? Comparing ARM and Intel architectures is like comparing helicopters with automobiles - they both have areas where they are a great fit - but neither address the full universe of applications.

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