Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
KKing1
User Rank
Rookie
RE: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
KKing1   9/22/2014 1:24:04 PM
NO RATINGS
Magnetic memory picture brought back memories (pun intended). Lucky enough to work for Dr An Wang at Wang Labs in MA.  Dr Wang is credited with the write-after-read which made magnetic core memories possible.  They were still used in some of the machines they were building at the time (yes I am that old).  When you're a young technician and have desktop programmable calculators and machines that ran BASIC readliy accessible to you, very cool indeed!

 

And YES, core memories were actually repairable.

VIntage Bits
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
VIntage Bits   4/11/2013 4:47:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Hmm. The reference to the 1401 and 36-bit words is wrong. The 1401 was a character machine, with each location consisting of 6 data bits, a word-mark bit and a parity bit. Based on the following reference to the 36-bit words of the 701, perhaps that was what was meant. Yes, I programmed a 1401 in autocoder. It was my second computer and second assembly language. By the way, it is possible to see a live 1401 at the Computer History Museum in Mountain View if you are there at the right time. The smell of the mechanical card equipment sure brings back memories.

jjgray
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
jjgray   4/11/2013 3:40:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I love that ball memory memory!

BrainiacV
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
BrainiacV   2/7/2013 4:34:14 PM
NO RATINGS
When I was programming conveyor systems I was introduced to, but thankfully never had to use, "Ball memory". It consisted of a series of wagon wheels(?) with a U channel carved in the rubber diameter. These wheels would be mounted a a single shaft with each wheel controlling a single diverter. The rotation of these wheels was geared to the movement of the conveyor belt. When a carton was destined for a certain lane, there was a solenoid that would inject a steel ball bearing into the U channel of the wheel. A microswitch would be positioned around the wheel at the location timed with the carton being at the diverter. The ball would be scooped out before making a complete rotation. A common problem was that the operators would forget to refill the input tray with the balls in the output tray. I know, not really electronics, but the mercury delay memory reminded me of it.

ronknief
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
ronknief   12/7/2012 8:02:47 PM
NO RATINGS
I worked on the FH-660 and Fastrand but am unfamiliar with the Univac drum that was 6' in diameter - do you have any other info on it?

R G.Neale
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
R G.Neale   12/7/2012 5:06:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Magnetic memory, I was reminded, when recently clearing out my attic, that as a cross between magnetic bubble memory and the latest racetrack memory, the magnetic CrossTie memory was once expected to do great things in the world of disc replacement and NV memory. Its structure was characterized by a series of sawtooth shaped films facing each other with the magnetic bits stepping along between opposing teeth. The other memory museum piece I found in the attic is a non-destructive readout magnetic square-loop core. This is a normal core with a second hole in the annulus that allowed the state of the main core to be read non-destructively. It appears to be wound with five wires. I think in application it was intended to serve as both a logic and memory device.

timbo_test
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
timbo_test   12/7/2012 10:13:58 AM
NO RATINGS
Thank you Kristin! interesting article. In the 1980s, for a few years, magnetic bubble memory was going to be the future of mass storage. Magnetic domains coded as North-South or South-North were steered around loops on a specially contructed ferromagnetic substrate. Bubble memory was too slow and never quite made it and the Winchester disk (and its derivatives) only now becoming overtaken by 'Flash' solid state technology.

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
Les_Slater   12/7/2012 12:01:05 AM
NO RATINGS
I remember these types of ROMs. I worked with one that worked as a character generator for a graphics display terminal, Computer Dispays Inc. ARDS. It was made of wires passing, or not passing, through the magnetic circuits (ferrite posts). The bottom had a bed of posts and a lid that (I think) completed the magnetic circuit. To edit, one had to lift the lid, clip a wire and then add a new one, going a different rout through the posts, connect the new wire and replace the lid.

Bellhop
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
Bellhop   12/6/2012 8:58:51 PM
NO RATINGS
I've always gotten a kick out of the electro-mechanical memory systems used to store settings on a pipe organ: http://www.colinpykett.org.uk/electro-mechanical-capture-systems.htm

BrainiacV
User Rank
Rookie
re: Slideshow: A brief history of memory
BrainiacV   12/5/2012 4:49:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Besides programming computers that used core memory, I bought some from a computer museum along with a silicon wafer. I took both to work one day to show the other programmers. Our 17 year old genius programmer thought the wafer was pretty cool, but when he looked at the core memory, he turned to me and asked, "How does it hold a charge?"

Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Most Recent Comments
Freek35
 
ROOMTEMPSC
 
seaEE
 
collin0
 
betajet
 
betajet
 
Bert22306
 
perl_geek
 
GregB1
Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Want a Voltera Desktop PCB Printer?
Max Maxfield
9 comments
I just received an email from my chum Javi in Spain. "Have you heard about Voltera (VolteraInc.com)? It's a Canadian company that is going to offer desktop-size PCB printers for fast ...

Aubrey Kagan

Have You Ever Been Blindsided by Your Own Design?
Aubrey Kagan
37 comments
I recently read GCHQ: The uncensored story of Britain's most sensitive intelligence agency by Richard J. Aldrich. The Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ), Britain's equivalent of ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
2 comments
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
15 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...