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Quintadad
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re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
Quintadad   12/7/2012 6:59:19 AM
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I'm a big fan of Win 7 (can't believe I said that!) I've been using Win 8 now for a few months as has my nephew (on ocassional visits.) He is 8. I am 56. I envy the fluid way in which he "intutively" finds his way around. It is telling that those of us who claim with pride our long experience with computers are also the ones most critical of the "intuitive" claim. Be a kid again. You might learn some new tricks!

lgadz61
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re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
lgadz61   12/7/2012 3:49:18 AM
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30+ years in computers. One thing I've always found with Microsoft software is that they sure leave lots of room for other people's software to fix their messes (misses?). There are a number of free, and for a price, "apps" that put the Win 7 Start button back along with other tweaks (remember TweakUI?). It won't take long for someone to fix most of the Win 8 warts. I stayed on XP as long as I could but found Win 7 relatively painless.

JuanP4
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re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
JuanP4   12/7/2012 3:29:22 AM
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I agree with the article. I hate windows 8. The issue is not even whether you are a content consumer or creator, but rather whether you want to be productive in a myriad of ways. Well, Windows 8 just get in the way. Never under estimate the potential of Microsoft to screw things up.

betajet
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CEO
re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
betajet   12/7/2012 2:30:01 AM
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If you want people to try something new, it should do something wonderful and be obviously better than what they're doing now. It should NOT elicit the reaction "What fresh Hell is this?" JMO/YMMV

betajet
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CEO
re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
betajet   12/7/2012 2:22:06 AM
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Windows 2000 is the only version of Windows I ever liked. XP made it harder to launch programs and W7 has all sorts of glitz that just gets in the way. So I followed Microsoft's implicit advice and switched over to GNU/Linux.

tb1
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re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
tb1   12/7/2012 1:48:03 AM
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If you want people to try something new, you invite them, you don't force them. The smartest thing Microsoft could have done was to have Windows 8 open up to a desktop, then allow people to open up a Metro window...if they want to. At first, they'll work as usual. Eventually curiosity will overcome them (or their kids will bug them: "You should try it. It's cool!"), and they will try it out. They'll probably even learn to like some of the new features. I'm predicting that they do this in their next Windows 8 release. Considering Microsoft used to be known for their useability labs, I'm surprised they didn't learn this lesson the easy way, rather than the hard way (with reduced sales from bewildered users).

zhgreader
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re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
zhgreader   12/7/2012 1:13:44 AM
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I don't know if I will buy this new system. From commends I know the ordinary users do not like to learn new functions and most likely adapt themself to no changing conditions. But every time microsoft shows their new version, there will be many changes to fit the young man or new learners. This seems that the world is belong to the young, to the new, to the change.

hazydave
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Manager
re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
hazydave   12/7/2012 1:12:33 AM
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There are a few problems with Windows 8. I don't think most of we techies are "resistant to change"; we tend, more often than not, to be neophiles. But change isn't a universal good... it's a vector. And in this case, it's change in the wrong direction, for creative users. The stuff you get first is the first problem. The tiles might seem cute, but mixing informational content with a program launcher just seems to me to codify the terrible mess you find on lazy Windows users' desktops. Worse yet, even at the tablet level, the UI just isn't intuitive. Of course I could learn it... but this is supposed to be a UI you just "get".. that's the whole point of de-evolving our UI tech for fingers and consumers. Compare it to Android or iOS... the latter is austere, but so simple pretty much anyone can pick it up and use it. The former has more options, a bit less polish, but again, it's obvious (in fact, I'm writing this on an Android tablet). It gets worse when that tablet UI moves to the desktop. It's bad with touch, worse with a mouse. This is already leading to bad ideas, like vertical touchscreens on desktops.. those "more experienced" in the crowd here might recall that screen input was tried, and rejected, in the early 80s... on both CAD systems and some personal computers, like the Commodore 64. It worked well... light pens, earlier touchscreens, etc. But on the desktop, way too much stress on the arms, versus horizontal input. And for creative types, the "Modern" (formerly Metro) UI is a step back almost to the bad old single tasking days. Content creation, whether schematic capture, PCB layout, video or audio production, multimedia authoring, etc. all involve the synthesis of a new thing from a variety of resources. Forcing the user to a single app per screen is just insane... I rarely have fewer than a dozen windows open, and its usually important that they share the same visual context... also why I have two monitors.

old account Frank Eory
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Rookie
re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
old account Frank Eory   12/6/2012 11:33:42 PM
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I haven't tried Window 8 yet, but from the comments here and elsewhere, I'm not particularly looking forward to it. When I'm working, I tend to like keeping lots of windows open, and if I can't see one peeking behind another, at least I can see their icons on the taskbar. I'm not a big fan of having an app occupy the entire screen and not knowing which other apps are still open. Even though I like my iOS devices for content consumption, I find it annoying that I have to constantly double tap the home key to see all the apps that are still running, and then kill them one by one to make them go away.

lslarry86
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Rookie
re: Donít talk to me about Windows 8!
lslarry86   12/6/2012 11:15:28 PM
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It took me a while, but I finally realized that the Metro screen has replaced the Start menu. Since the Start menu is now full screen, you have to click something to get back to Desktop. That made it all less disorienting for me. I do think it's ironic that some Windows boosters are encouraging folks to use keyboard shortcuts if they can't figure out what to click.

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