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bbaudis021
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:59:11 AM
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BTW ... have not done it for decades and still fending off requests for COBOL work ...

bbaudis021
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:59:11 AM
NO RATINGS
BTW ... have not done it for decades and still fending off requests for COBOL work ...

bbaudis021
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:57:42 AM
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PC is dead ... so is mainframe and supercomputer, right? And where all these smartphone-tablets connect to get all these maps etc etc ... aw ... of course the cloud ... Sad to spoil the fun but the cloud consist of servers managed and fed by desktops. OK, I am biased here, I need 64-bit at least 16MB to do my work ... My wife on the other hand has a iPhone, iPad and when she process the photos she ... goes to our 16MB 64-bit iMac!

bbaudis021
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:57:42 AM
NO RATINGS
PC is dead ... so is mainframe and supercomputer, right? And where all these smartphone-tablets connect to get all these maps etc etc ... aw ... of course the cloud ... Sad to spoil the fun but the cloud consist of servers managed and fed by desktops. OK, I am biased here, I need 64-bit at least 16MB to do my work ... My wife on the other hand has a iPhone, iPad and when she process the photos she ... goes to our 16MB 64-bit iMac!

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/3/2013 4:17:39 PM
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If you dig far enough, it seems like Windows 8 does most of the desktop features of Windows 7. They are just much more difficult to find and more awkward to use. It seems to me that just having a setting that defaults to a desktop metaphor but can be easily switched to the "metro" style would solve most of my complaints. MS has done that before. Windows XP had a setting that made it look like 98. It won't surprise me if a service pack comes along at some point with just that feature.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/3/2013 4:17:39 PM
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If you dig far enough, it seems like Windows 8 does most of the desktop features of Windows 7. They are just much more difficult to find and more awkward to use. It seems to me that just having a setting that defaults to a desktop metaphor but can be easily switched to the "metro" style would solve most of my complaints. MS has done that before. Windows XP had a setting that made it look like 98. It won't surprise me if a service pack comes along at some point with just that feature.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   1/2/2013 11:26:50 PM
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Windows 8 would be easy enough to fix. I can't blame Microsoft for wanting to come out with a unified OS, but there's no excuse to optimize it just for hand-held toys. Simply create optional desktops, so you don't end up with ridiculous-looking gargantuan tiles on large monitors. Higher resolution in displays has always been used to allow more content on the screen at once. Why is it so hard to understand that the same idea applies here? PC users want a lot of stuff on the screen, and they want to have lots of different sessions or documents open simultaneously. So, make that at least optional on Win8. As to "post PC era," it just sounds like a facile media-babble term. Sort of like "post-industrial era." They are easy to spit out, but looking deeper, utterly meaningless.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   1/2/2013 11:26:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Windows 8 would be easy enough to fix. I can't blame Microsoft for wanting to come out with a unified OS, but there's no excuse to optimize it just for hand-held toys. Simply create optional desktops, so you don't end up with ridiculous-looking gargantuan tiles on large monitors. Higher resolution in displays has always been used to allow more content on the screen at once. Why is it so hard to understand that the same idea applies here? PC users want a lot of stuff on the screen, and they want to have lots of different sessions or documents open simultaneously. So, make that at least optional on Win8. As to "post PC era," it just sounds like a facile media-babble term. Sort of like "post-industrial era." They are easy to spit out, but looking deeper, utterly meaningless.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/2/2013 9:33:50 PM
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Regarding the "end of the PC era": I would look at it more as a division than an end. Tablets seem to be more of media consumption devices while PCs are more oriented around creation or manipulation of data and media. I see two main reasons that tablets have hit such a cord. One is that a very large number of people only use their computers for media consumption. They pretty much read, browse or watch. Facebook and email are also easy enough to use on a tablet (or smart phone). These folks have been way under-utilizing their PCs. A tablet will do what they want for less money and with more convenience. The second reason is that for people who do create or manipulate, many of them often don't need all of that capability all of the time. If that's the case and they have the funds to purchase an extra device, than a tablet becomes a wise choice. I think this is where Windows 8 misses the mark by so much. It's trying to turn a PC into primarily a media consumption device, when the folks that will need the full capabilities of a PC are primarily doing other things. When they are consuming, often as not, they are playing a game (or compiling), watching a video on the side, instant messaging, voice chatting and reading all at the same time. The PC is not the market for a primarily-consumption device.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/2/2013 9:33:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Regarding the "end of the PC era": I would look at it more as a division than an end. Tablets seem to be more of media consumption devices while PCs are more oriented around creation or manipulation of data and media. I see two main reasons that tablets have hit such a cord. One is that a very large number of people only use their computers for media consumption. They pretty much read, browse or watch. Facebook and email are also easy enough to use on a tablet (or smart phone). These folks have been way under-utilizing their PCs. A tablet will do what they want for less money and with more convenience. The second reason is that for people who do create or manipulate, many of them often don't need all of that capability all of the time. If that's the case and they have the funds to purchase an extra device, than a tablet becomes a wise choice. I think this is where Windows 8 misses the mark by so much. It's trying to turn a PC into primarily a media consumption device, when the folks that will need the full capabilities of a PC are primarily doing other things. When they are consuming, often as not, they are playing a game (or compiling), watching a video on the side, instant messaging, voice chatting and reading all at the same time. The PC is not the market for a primarily-consumption device.

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