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Chris.
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Chris.   12/20/2012 5:08:54 PM
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Hope BB is either paying Apple for royalties, or getting ready for a court battle as this device looks a lot like a rectangle with rounded corners.

Chris.
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Chris.   12/20/2012 5:08:54 PM
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Hope BB is either paying Apple for royalties, or getting ready for a court battle as this device looks a lot like a rectangle with rounded corners.

help.fulguy
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
help.fulguy   12/20/2012 5:28:45 PM
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Nothing but Junk from Junko. Piece of crap

help.fulguy
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
help.fulguy   12/20/2012 5:28:45 PM
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Nothing but Junk from Junko. Piece of crap

David Benjamin
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
David Benjamin   12/20/2012 9:41:41 PM
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Effulgence, fulofcrapguy. Respond to the issues, instead of just hurling insults. This isn't junior high school, kid.

David Benjamin
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
David Benjamin   12/20/2012 9:41:41 PM
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Effulgence, fulofcrapguy. Respond to the issues, instead of just hurling insults. This isn't junior high school, kid.

Chee Choy
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Chee Choy   12/20/2012 10:43:26 PM
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Simply there are more alternatives for the users of emailing, browsing, videos and pictures handlings besides PC, is no longer the sole machine to do it as last time since now there are more devices smartphone, tablets etc could do these simple tasks on the move. PC marketplace just back to what it suppose to.

Chee Choy
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Chee Choy   12/20/2012 10:43:26 PM
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Simply there are more alternatives for the users of emailing, browsing, videos and pictures handlings besides PC, is no longer the sole machine to do it as last time since now there are more devices smartphone, tablets etc could do these simple tasks on the move. PC marketplace just back to what it suppose to.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   12/20/2012 11:24:10 PM
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"Today, consumers have few compelling reasons to purchase new PCs. Practically everything consumers want to do – like posting photos on Facebook, getting directions on Google Map, or e-mail – can be done on mobile phones." Practically nothing I want to do can be done well on a smartphone, and I'm a consumer. Even lightweight non-work related stuff, like editing photographs, or watching TV and movies, is remotely optimal on a smartphone. Never mind writing software or doing any real work (including school work). "Of course, we’ll all continue to work on PCs at the office, but this alone won’t drive up the numbers for PC shipments, either." Precisely. At home too. Eventually, products reach a plateau, where replacements, rather than new purchases, create the biggest demand. HARDLY translates to "the end of an era." How overly dramatic. "It’s time for everyone to accept the end of the PC era." That's a non-sequitur. Is the demand for bars of soap ever rising? Probably not. So, are we beyond the "bars of soap era"? I don't get why the trade press is so fond of this silly mantra, quite honestly. All products go through a sharp rise in sales initially, assuming they are useful, and eventually the market reaches saturation. Doesn't mean the products become unnecessary. Contrast this with the Blackberry vs other smartphone issue you pointed out. Now THAT makes sense. This "post PC era" stuff continues to sound really off the wall, sorry.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   12/20/2012 11:24:10 PM
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"Today, consumers have few compelling reasons to purchase new PCs. Practically everything consumers want to do – like posting photos on Facebook, getting directions on Google Map, or e-mail – can be done on mobile phones." Practically nothing I want to do can be done well on a smartphone, and I'm a consumer. Even lightweight non-work related stuff, like editing photographs, or watching TV and movies, is remotely optimal on a smartphone. Never mind writing software or doing any real work (including school work). "Of course, we’ll all continue to work on PCs at the office, but this alone won’t drive up the numbers for PC shipments, either." Precisely. At home too. Eventually, products reach a plateau, where replacements, rather than new purchases, create the biggest demand. HARDLY translates to "the end of an era." How overly dramatic. "It’s time for everyone to accept the end of the PC era." That's a non-sequitur. Is the demand for bars of soap ever rising? Probably not. So, are we beyond the "bars of soap era"? I don't get why the trade press is so fond of this silly mantra, quite honestly. All products go through a sharp rise in sales initially, assuming they are useful, and eventually the market reaches saturation. Doesn't mean the products become unnecessary. Contrast this with the Blackberry vs other smartphone issue you pointed out. Now THAT makes sense. This "post PC era" stuff continues to sound really off the wall, sorry.

Thomas Chongruk
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Thomas Chongruk   12/20/2012 11:29:22 PM
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Apple is just copying Google with the Maps issue. When Google was releasing Android a few years ago their initial versions (pre 1.0) relied on Microsoft API for the mapping, and then they removed it.

Thomas Chongruk
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Thomas Chongruk   12/20/2012 11:29:22 PM
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Apple is just copying Google with the Maps issue. When Google was releasing Android a few years ago their initial versions (pre 1.0) relied on Microsoft API for the mapping, and then they removed it.

Diogenes53
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Diogenes53   12/21/2012 12:39:14 AM
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"A group of lithography experts estimates that commercialization of 14-nm chip fabrication could slip to 2014 or beyond unless powerful light sources of EUV can be perfected." (May I respectfully suggest you find new lithography "experts". These are the same dudes who estimated commercialization of EUV at 65nm so many, many years ago. Ask a marketing guy without an ax to grind) "Meanwhile, Intel and the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. aren’t giving up. In October, they committed billions of dollars to the Dutch EUV developer ASML." (Of course they are giving up. Those billions are for 450mm wafer, enabling ASML to continue to save [everyone's] face on EUV while really focusing on 450). "Holding up the promised delivery of EUV is the use of light sources nearly 20 times more powerful than those used today." (When is the last time you saw a 20X increase in 2 years....zzzzzzzzzz). "But throughput remains 15 to 30 times too slow for Intel, Samsung and TSMC." (It really says 15-30X more expensive for something that was too expensive at 125WSPH anyway!) "All this could mean that Moore’s Law might finally be running out of steam." (Where have I heard this before?) This EUV is either (1) terrible or (2) the remaining EUV diehards are finally waving a white flag.

Diogenes53
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Diogenes53   12/21/2012 12:39:14 AM
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"A group of lithography experts estimates that commercialization of 14-nm chip fabrication could slip to 2014 or beyond unless powerful light sources of EUV can be perfected." (May I respectfully suggest you find new lithography "experts". These are the same dudes who estimated commercialization of EUV at 65nm so many, many years ago. Ask a marketing guy without an ax to grind) "Meanwhile, Intel and the Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. aren’t giving up. In October, they committed billions of dollars to the Dutch EUV developer ASML." (Of course they are giving up. Those billions are for 450mm wafer, enabling ASML to continue to save [everyone's] face on EUV while really focusing on 450). "Holding up the promised delivery of EUV is the use of light sources nearly 20 times more powerful than those used today." (When is the last time you saw a 20X increase in 2 years....zzzzzzzzzz). "But throughput remains 15 to 30 times too slow for Intel, Samsung and TSMC." (It really says 15-30X more expensive for something that was too expensive at 125WSPH anyway!) "All this could mean that Moore’s Law might finally be running out of steam." (Where have I heard this before?) This EUV is either (1) terrible or (2) the remaining EUV diehards are finally waving a white flag.

David.Beierl
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
David.Beierl   12/22/2012 3:01:35 AM
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I completely agree.

David.Beierl
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
David.Beierl   12/22/2012 3:01:35 AM
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I completely agree.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/22/2012 6:17:11 AM
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I'm not sure Intel's handling of Ottelini's resignation constitutes a tech blunder. We won't be able to make a call on that till they've picked a new CEO and he's been in office long enough for preliminary results to be evident. Sure, good companies have a succession plan. But the fact that Intel didn't announce a successor to Ottelini doesn't mean they *don't* have one. If Ottelini is capable, he's been grooming potential internal successors, and may have presented several possible candidates to Intel's board. He might also have mentioned possible candidates outside of Intel. But who the next CEO is isn't his call - it's the board's. He announced his resignation 6 months out, but he's still in the ofice on the job - the resignation won't take effect for a while. He's given the board 6 months to consider who the new guy ought to be. When he actually *does* leave Intel, if it *has* a functioning succession plan, the board will announce who his replacement will be. Then we'll find out how well they've done *their* main job, which is to *hire* the CEO.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/22/2012 6:17:11 AM
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I'm not sure Intel's handling of Ottelini's resignation constitutes a tech blunder. We won't be able to make a call on that till they've picked a new CEO and he's been in office long enough for preliminary results to be evident. Sure, good companies have a succession plan. But the fact that Intel didn't announce a successor to Ottelini doesn't mean they *don't* have one. If Ottelini is capable, he's been grooming potential internal successors, and may have presented several possible candidates to Intel's board. He might also have mentioned possible candidates outside of Intel. But who the next CEO is isn't his call - it's the board's. He announced his resignation 6 months out, but he's still in the ofice on the job - the resignation won't take effect for a while. He's given the board 6 months to consider who the new guy ought to be. When he actually *does* leave Intel, if it *has* a functioning succession plan, the board will announce who his replacement will be. Then we'll find out how well they've done *their* main job, which is to *hire* the CEO.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/22/2012 6:32:13 AM
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Color me as another unconvinced that the PC market is dead. Sure, the action is in mobile devices, and particularly smartphones. But that hardly means the death of the PC, because of all the things you *can't* do on a smartphone. For instance, I'm currently designing a publication for a non-profit's annual convention. I'm spending a fair bit of time in a DTP program, refining a design, working on a big monitor that will let me view two 8.5x11 pages side by side in almost full size. That simply isn't *possible* on a smartphone, or any other mobile device, because the form factor is all wrong. And that's just one example. There are all too many things where you really need a big monitor, full size keyboard, and mouse, with a fast CPU, lots of RAM, and fairly high end graphics. Lots of the things touted as people *doing* on a smartphone are things I would not use one for. Again, the issue is form factor. Most of what I do really needs a bigger screen *and* a proper keyboard - virtual keyboards and thumbboards are not adequate substitutes. I grant that the PC market is unlikely to grow, and growth is in tablets and smartphones, but I can't call a market that will still sell millions of devices per year dead. George and Junko, if you actually *believe* the PC market is dead, show the courage of your convictions. Turn off your PCs and do everything you do for EETimes from your smartphones/tablets. I bet you *can't*.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/22/2012 6:32:13 AM
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Color me as another unconvinced that the PC market is dead. Sure, the action is in mobile devices, and particularly smartphones. But that hardly means the death of the PC, because of all the things you *can't* do on a smartphone. For instance, I'm currently designing a publication for a non-profit's annual convention. I'm spending a fair bit of time in a DTP program, refining a design, working on a big monitor that will let me view two 8.5x11 pages side by side in almost full size. That simply isn't *possible* on a smartphone, or any other mobile device, because the form factor is all wrong. And that's just one example. There are all too many things where you really need a big monitor, full size keyboard, and mouse, with a fast CPU, lots of RAM, and fairly high end graphics. Lots of the things touted as people *doing* on a smartphone are things I would not use one for. Again, the issue is form factor. Most of what I do really needs a bigger screen *and* a proper keyboard - virtual keyboards and thumbboards are not adequate substitutes. I grant that the PC market is unlikely to grow, and growth is in tablets and smartphones, but I can't call a market that will still sell millions of devices per year dead. George and Junko, if you actually *believe* the PC market is dead, show the courage of your convictions. Turn off your PCs and do everything you do for EETimes from your smartphones/tablets. I bet you *can't*.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   12/22/2012 8:07:16 AM
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Is a CEO issue a tech blunder or just a management problem?

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   12/22/2012 8:07:16 AM
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Is a CEO issue a tech blunder or just a management problem?

JimJarvis
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
JimJarvis   12/22/2012 4:17:35 PM
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Hardly a tech blunder. What 'considering outsiders' means is that there is more than one internal candidate. It'll be interesting to see what Otellini and the board come up with, and who leaves as a result.

JimJarvis
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
JimJarvis   12/22/2012 4:17:35 PM
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Hardly a tech blunder. What 'considering outsiders' means is that there is more than one internal candidate. It'll be interesting to see what Otellini and the board come up with, and who leaves as a result.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   12/22/2012 11:36:47 PM
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I would suggest that one "tech-related blunder" not mentioned in the article might be the 2012 lawsuit of Apple vs Samsung. I think that Apple came away looking like a schoolyard bully, that the jury came out looking like they had been poorly coached, with a foreman who appeared to have his own baggage-axe to grind, and that ultimately this caused courts elesewhere in the world to retaliate. The long-lasting effects might not be obvious yet, or who knows, there might be none, but I think it was definitely a blunder.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   12/22/2012 11:36:47 PM
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I would suggest that one "tech-related blunder" not mentioned in the article might be the 2012 lawsuit of Apple vs Samsung. I think that Apple came away looking like a schoolyard bully, that the jury came out looking like they had been poorly coached, with a foreman who appeared to have his own baggage-axe to grind, and that ultimately this caused courts elesewhere in the world to retaliate. The long-lasting effects might not be obvious yet, or who knows, there might be none, but I think it was definitely a blunder.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/23/2012 3:55:54 AM
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Hear, hear! And one question to ask is "Why did Apple do it?" The courts have simply become one more playing field in which companies compete, and attempting to throw legal spanners into others works is common practice. But you can argue Apple didn't really *need* to do this. The iPhone and iPad are fantastically successful, and are a major reason why Apple is in the position it is, with revenues and profits on its lines other device makers would kill for. And why Samsung is mounting an actual competitive challenge, Apple is in no imminent danger from them. It doesn't have to compete in the courtroom because it's doing so well in the marketplace. It made me think about personalities, ego, and the stamp CEOs put on their companies. Steve Jobs was exceptionally competitive, and took any challenges personally. Any company who seemed to be doing anything like what Apple was doing in a line Apple was in was seen by him as copying Apple, and the result was outrage and fury, and a determination to get the copier. Steve's vision and attitudes permeated Apple. I saw the lawsuit as an outgrowth of that. Steve would have been outraged and furious that Samsung was doing something like Apple when competing with them, and his reflex would have been to go for the kill. Apple is molded in Steve's likeness, so that's what it did. You can probably make a business case that it was ultimately time and effort that would have been better spent on other things, but corporate egos tend to be unbounded in cases like this, and the lawsuit was offended ego.

DMcCunney
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
DMcCunney   12/23/2012 3:55:54 AM
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Hear, hear! And one question to ask is "Why did Apple do it?" The courts have simply become one more playing field in which companies compete, and attempting to throw legal spanners into others works is common practice. But you can argue Apple didn't really *need* to do this. The iPhone and iPad are fantastically successful, and are a major reason why Apple is in the position it is, with revenues and profits on its lines other device makers would kill for. And why Samsung is mounting an actual competitive challenge, Apple is in no imminent danger from them. It doesn't have to compete in the courtroom because it's doing so well in the marketplace. It made me think about personalities, ego, and the stamp CEOs put on their companies. Steve Jobs was exceptionally competitive, and took any challenges personally. Any company who seemed to be doing anything like what Apple was doing in a line Apple was in was seen by him as copying Apple, and the result was outrage and fury, and a determination to get the copier. Steve's vision and attitudes permeated Apple. I saw the lawsuit as an outgrowth of that. Steve would have been outraged and furious that Samsung was doing something like Apple when competing with them, and his reflex would have been to go for the kill. Apple is molded in Steve's likeness, so that's what it did. You can probably make a business case that it was ultimately time and effort that would have been better spent on other things, but corporate egos tend to be unbounded in cases like this, and the lawsuit was offended ego.

GPBobby
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
GPBobby   12/23/2012 4:25:25 PM
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Why are we comparing a portable telephone with a desktop computer in the first place? I own an iPhone and a Mac. They're not interchangeable. If I could only have one, it would be the desktop. I've lived w/o a phone for years, and now credit them mostly with making payphones collectors' items. I rarely get anyone who uses one to answer - they're probably shuffling photo's between "friends," which I'm sure they "like," or keeping track of their morning Pilates which they may not. Long live the pc.

GPBobby
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
GPBobby   12/23/2012 4:25:25 PM
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Why are we comparing a portable telephone with a desktop computer in the first place? I own an iPhone and a Mac. They're not interchangeable. If I could only have one, it would be the desktop. I've lived w/o a phone for years, and now credit them mostly with making payphones collectors' items. I rarely get anyone who uses one to answer - they're probably shuffling photo's between "friends," which I'm sure they "like," or keeping track of their morning Pilates which they may not. Long live the pc.

Galaxis
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Galaxis   12/23/2012 9:00:52 PM
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Well said! This whole PC bashing doesn't make any sense. Few people will trade in their home PC for just a smartphone or tablet. It's just the industry who can't get stellar profit margins on a commodity product.

Galaxis
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Galaxis   12/23/2012 9:00:52 PM
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Well said! This whole PC bashing doesn't make any sense. Few people will trade in their home PC for just a smartphone or tablet. It's just the industry who can't get stellar profit margins on a commodity product.

ttt3
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
ttt3   12/24/2012 5:35:13 AM
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While I agree with you in general, I still find web browsing to be quite acceptable on tablet and smartphone. Many people used to use their pcs for web browsing; this is no longer necessary. It's simply much easier to pick up a smartphone or tablet than it is a laptop or desktop if all you want to do is catch up on the news, etc. Would I get rid of my personal laptop? No. Does my laptop see a lot use in my free time since my tablet and smartphone have entered the fold? Absolutely. I don't think pcs will go away, but I do think their replacement sales will be much less frequent from here on out.

ttt3
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ttt3   12/24/2012 5:35:13 AM
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While I agree with you in general, I still find web browsing to be quite acceptable on tablet and smartphone. Many people used to use their pcs for web browsing; this is no longer necessary. It's simply much easier to pick up a smartphone or tablet than it is a laptop or desktop if all you want to do is catch up on the news, etc. Would I get rid of my personal laptop? No. Does my laptop see a lot use in my free time since my tablet and smartphone have entered the fold? Absolutely. I don't think pcs will go away, but I do think their replacement sales will be much less frequent from here on out.

ttt3
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
ttt3   12/24/2012 5:36:39 AM
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Sorry, "does my laptop see a lot LESS use..."

ttt3
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
ttt3   12/24/2012 5:36:39 AM
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Sorry, "does my laptop see a lot LESS use..."

chrisshore
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
chrisshore   12/24/2012 10:25:08 AM
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Not dead, no. But definitely no longer the focus of the market. Even 5 years ago, if you wanted to do pretty much anything online (think web, mail etc) you needed a PC or a pretty good laptop. Now, you can do 99% of that on a phone or a tablet. Yes, there are things you still need a laptop/PC for but they are not the things which are driving volume growth in the industry. The PC format will become, is becoming, a niche in a much bigger market. It won't die but it will get much smaller in the great scheme of things. At home, we have a desktop. Three years ago, we acquired a tablet. Overnight, use of the desktop plummeted by 95%. There is almost nothing (short of high-end games and things like music notation) which we need that much power or screen real-estate for. At work, I use a laptop and used to carry it all over the world with me. These days, I do short trips with a pad. My laptop is still on my desk but it is no longer used for everything I do. That's the change that is happening and it will affect the market enormously. It will change the balance on processor choice, form factor choice, OS choice, connectivity choice etc. PCs aren't dead but they are losing their dominance. Merry Christmas Chris

chrisshore
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
chrisshore   12/24/2012 10:25:08 AM
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Not dead, no. But definitely no longer the focus of the market. Even 5 years ago, if you wanted to do pretty much anything online (think web, mail etc) you needed a PC or a pretty good laptop. Now, you can do 99% of that on a phone or a tablet. Yes, there are things you still need a laptop/PC for but they are not the things which are driving volume growth in the industry. The PC format will become, is becoming, a niche in a much bigger market. It won't die but it will get much smaller in the great scheme of things. At home, we have a desktop. Three years ago, we acquired a tablet. Overnight, use of the desktop plummeted by 95%. There is almost nothing (short of high-end games and things like music notation) which we need that much power or screen real-estate for. At work, I use a laptop and used to carry it all over the world with me. These days, I do short trips with a pad. My laptop is still on my desk but it is no longer used for everything I do. That's the change that is happening and it will affect the market enormously. It will change the balance on processor choice, form factor choice, OS choice, connectivity choice etc. PCs aren't dead but they are losing their dominance. Merry Christmas Chris

IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc   12/31/2012 5:47:21 PM
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A couple of years ago, WIRED magazine had an article on 'Good Enough' technology. It went on to explain how certain technologies become favorable to the masses based on convenience despite being a step backwards technically. (i.e. MP3's are a step backwards in audio fidelity, but the convenience of not carrying around Vinyl wins out) Compared to a desktop computer, tablets and smartphones are 'good enough' technology. The experience of entering text into the address bar of your browser did not improve on the 'phablet' ... it became much, much worse, but the convenience of being portable overshadows these shortcomings. As an engineer, I consider the adoption of 'good enough' technology to be a serious tech blunder ... however, the shareholders tells me otherwise. Profit will always trump technology for the modern day industrialized man and that, my friend, is the biggest tech blunder ever.

IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc   12/31/2012 5:47:21 PM
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A couple of years ago, WIRED magazine had an article on 'Good Enough' technology. It went on to explain how certain technologies become favorable to the masses based on convenience despite being a step backwards technically. (i.e. MP3's are a step backwards in audio fidelity, but the convenience of not carrying around Vinyl wins out) Compared to a desktop computer, tablets and smartphones are 'good enough' technology. The experience of entering text into the address bar of your browser did not improve on the 'phablet' ... it became much, much worse, but the convenience of being portable overshadows these shortcomings. As an engineer, I consider the adoption of 'good enough' technology to be a serious tech blunder ... however, the shareholders tells me otherwise. Profit will always trump technology for the modern day industrialized man and that, my friend, is the biggest tech blunder ever.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/2/2013 9:33:50 PM
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Regarding the "end of the PC era": I would look at it more as a division than an end. Tablets seem to be more of media consumption devices while PCs are more oriented around creation or manipulation of data and media. I see two main reasons that tablets have hit such a cord. One is that a very large number of people only use their computers for media consumption. They pretty much read, browse or watch. Facebook and email are also easy enough to use on a tablet (or smart phone). These folks have been way under-utilizing their PCs. A tablet will do what they want for less money and with more convenience. The second reason is that for people who do create or manipulate, many of them often don't need all of that capability all of the time. If that's the case and they have the funds to purchase an extra device, than a tablet becomes a wise choice. I think this is where Windows 8 misses the mark by so much. It's trying to turn a PC into primarily a media consumption device, when the folks that will need the full capabilities of a PC are primarily doing other things. When they are consuming, often as not, they are playing a game (or compiling), watching a video on the side, instant messaging, voice chatting and reading all at the same time. The PC is not the market for a primarily-consumption device.

Duane Benson
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/2/2013 9:33:50 PM
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Regarding the "end of the PC era": I would look at it more as a division than an end. Tablets seem to be more of media consumption devices while PCs are more oriented around creation or manipulation of data and media. I see two main reasons that tablets have hit such a cord. One is that a very large number of people only use their computers for media consumption. They pretty much read, browse or watch. Facebook and email are also easy enough to use on a tablet (or smart phone). These folks have been way under-utilizing their PCs. A tablet will do what they want for less money and with more convenience. The second reason is that for people who do create or manipulate, many of them often don't need all of that capability all of the time. If that's the case and they have the funds to purchase an extra device, than a tablet becomes a wise choice. I think this is where Windows 8 misses the mark by so much. It's trying to turn a PC into primarily a media consumption device, when the folks that will need the full capabilities of a PC are primarily doing other things. When they are consuming, often as not, they are playing a game (or compiling), watching a video on the side, instant messaging, voice chatting and reading all at the same time. The PC is not the market for a primarily-consumption device.

Bert22306
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re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   1/2/2013 11:26:50 PM
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Windows 8 would be easy enough to fix. I can't blame Microsoft for wanting to come out with a unified OS, but there's no excuse to optimize it just for hand-held toys. Simply create optional desktops, so you don't end up with ridiculous-looking gargantuan tiles on large monitors. Higher resolution in displays has always been used to allow more content on the screen at once. Why is it so hard to understand that the same idea applies here? PC users want a lot of stuff on the screen, and they want to have lots of different sessions or documents open simultaneously. So, make that at least optional on Win8. As to "post PC era," it just sounds like a facile media-babble term. Sort of like "post-industrial era." They are easy to spit out, but looking deeper, utterly meaningless.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Bert22306   1/2/2013 11:26:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Windows 8 would be easy enough to fix. I can't blame Microsoft for wanting to come out with a unified OS, but there's no excuse to optimize it just for hand-held toys. Simply create optional desktops, so you don't end up with ridiculous-looking gargantuan tiles on large monitors. Higher resolution in displays has always been used to allow more content on the screen at once. Why is it so hard to understand that the same idea applies here? PC users want a lot of stuff on the screen, and they want to have lots of different sessions or documents open simultaneously. So, make that at least optional on Win8. As to "post PC era," it just sounds like a facile media-babble term. Sort of like "post-industrial era." They are easy to spit out, but looking deeper, utterly meaningless.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/3/2013 4:17:39 PM
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If you dig far enough, it seems like Windows 8 does most of the desktop features of Windows 7. They are just much more difficult to find and more awkward to use. It seems to me that just having a setting that defaults to a desktop metaphor but can be easily switched to the "metro" style would solve most of my complaints. MS has done that before. Windows XP had a setting that made it look like 98. It won't surprise me if a service pack comes along at some point with just that feature.

Duane Benson
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Blogger
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
Duane Benson   1/3/2013 4:17:39 PM
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If you dig far enough, it seems like Windows 8 does most of the desktop features of Windows 7. They are just much more difficult to find and more awkward to use. It seems to me that just having a setting that defaults to a desktop metaphor but can be easily switched to the "metro" style would solve most of my complaints. MS has done that before. Windows XP had a setting that made it look like 98. It won't surprise me if a service pack comes along at some point with just that feature.

bbaudis021
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:57:42 AM
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PC is dead ... so is mainframe and supercomputer, right? And where all these smartphone-tablets connect to get all these maps etc etc ... aw ... of course the cloud ... Sad to spoil the fun but the cloud consist of servers managed and fed by desktops. OK, I am biased here, I need 64-bit at least 16MB to do my work ... My wife on the other hand has a iPhone, iPad and when she process the photos she ... goes to our 16MB 64-bit iMac!

bbaudis021
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:57:42 AM
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PC is dead ... so is mainframe and supercomputer, right? And where all these smartphone-tablets connect to get all these maps etc etc ... aw ... of course the cloud ... Sad to spoil the fun but the cloud consist of servers managed and fed by desktops. OK, I am biased here, I need 64-bit at least 16MB to do my work ... My wife on the other hand has a iPhone, iPad and when she process the photos she ... goes to our 16MB 64-bit iMac!

bbaudis021
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:59:11 AM
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BTW ... have not done it for decades and still fending off requests for COBOL work ...

bbaudis021
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
bbaudis021   1/6/2013 3:59:11 AM
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BTW ... have not done it for decades and still fending off requests for COBOL work ...

vapats
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
vapats   1/9/2013 8:35:13 PM
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I'm very surprised that the LCD price-fixing scandal wasn't mentioned.

vapats
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
vapats   1/9/2013 8:35:13 PM
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I'm very surprised that the LCD price-fixing scandal wasn't mentioned.

yalanand
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
yalanand   1/13/2013 5:13:06 AM
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@bogdanbm, very valid point. Cloud eventually consists of servers and desktops. So PC will still exist even if the end user adopts smartphones/tablets instead of laptop/desktop.

yalanand
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
yalanand   1/13/2013 5:13:06 AM
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@bogdanbm, very valid point. Cloud eventually consists of servers and desktops. So PC will still exist even if the end user adopts smartphones/tablets instead of laptop/desktop.

KRS03
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
KRS03   1/27/2013 2:16:21 AM
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How common - a comment hastily/haphazardly written on a smart(dumb)phone.

KRS03
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
KRS03   1/27/2013 2:16:21 AM
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How common - a comment hastily/haphazardly written on a smart(dumb)phone.

powermimmo
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
powermimmo   2/19/2013 4:14:14 AM
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I would mention the Steve Job's lack in Apple is leading it to a decline, but this holds for 2013 reportage

powermimmo
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
powermimmo   2/19/2013 4:14:14 AM
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I would mention the Steve Job's lack in Apple is leading it to a decline, but this holds for 2013 reportage

FBMcGalliard
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
FBMcGalliard   4/10/2013 3:43:38 PM
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Iphone, Ipad, Laptop, and desktop. Each provides an optimum service area and some overlap. Which one would I do without? Try editing photos, dealing with a terrabite folder full of photos, composing a substantial communication with graphics, managing the home finances, on a cell phone. Try dragging your laptop out to read or watch a movie on the plane or lounging on the beach. Try finding a nearby health care when you have pneumonia on vacation. Map stuff without the pad is hard. My put? You need all three tools to manage a normal household, and the desktop if you want to do anything resembling serious labor.

FBMcGalliard
User Rank
Rookie
re: Top 10 tech blunders of 2012
FBMcGalliard   4/10/2013 3:43:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Iphone, Ipad, Laptop, and desktop. Each provides an optimum service area and some overlap. Which one would I do without? Try editing photos, dealing with a terrabite folder full of photos, composing a substantial communication with graphics, managing the home finances, on a cell phone. Try dragging your laptop out to read or watch a movie on the plane or lounging on the beach. Try finding a nearby health care when you have pneumonia on vacation. Map stuff without the pad is hard. My put? You need all three tools to manage a normal household, and the desktop if you want to do anything resembling serious labor.



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