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TarraTarra!
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
TarraTarra!   1/11/2013 9:41:23 PM
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ARM's cpu designs sometimes get too much credit for the success of ARM ISA in the mobile space. Truth is that the most succesful ARM CPU in the mobile space right now is a custom designed one from Qualcomm. Most semi companies have realized this which is why there seems to be a beeline to license the architecture. AppliedMicro seems to have been the first one to wisen up to this, then there is Cavium, AMD, now Broadcom and I am sure others will follow.

help.fulguy
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
help.fulguy   1/10/2013 7:34:12 PM
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@Peterclarke, increasingly it looks like using ARM core is non-differentiating. Everybody has ARM. So, whats the big f***ing deal.

sranje
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
sranje   1/10/2013 3:41:34 PM
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Perhaps "the real men fine-tune ARM standard cores" - to paraphrase Jerry Sanders

Peter Clarke
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
Peter Clarke   1/10/2013 10:35:27 AM
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@iniewski However, it looks like using off-the-shelf cores is increasingly non-differentiating. It is true you can get to market quicker if you use ARM core, ARM POP, but only at the same pace as the competition.

krisi
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
krisi   1/10/2013 2:47:26 AM
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Sure taking an ARM architecture let's you design your own CPU...but it takes money and time to do that...just throwing ARM cores into your own SoC is presumably faster...Samsung seems to be doing just fine with that approach

Loek.Frederiks_#2
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re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
Loek.Frederiks_#2   1/9/2013 8:13:37 PM
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Article is not 100% correct. What it means is that next to Nvidia, Qualcomm, AMD and Apple, Broadcom is the next (mobile) SoC maker in line taking an *architecture* license, allowing itself to design its own CPU (architecture, pipeline etc) using the ARM ISA. Interesting move.... Makes you wonder why Samsung doesn't do this. Just throwing more vanilla ARM cores into a SoC won't give you a competitive edge in the end.. (vanilla is still your own P&R, but nothing else)

krisi
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CEO
re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
krisi   1/9/2013 4:50:24 PM
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Agree...moving away from Mips towards ARM

sranje
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Manager
re: Broadcom takes two ARM architecture licenses
sranje   1/9/2013 3:06:13 PM
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Very indicatve -- possibly deemphasizing its reliance on MIPS?



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