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Andy_I
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re: What were they thinking: A crazy patent makes money
Andy_I   1/19/2013 5:08:25 PM
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Peanut butter on both sides is something I had been doing decades ago. I didn't think it was so unusual. It helps keep the jelly from bleeding through the bread, useful for sandwiches made at breakfast time but not eaten until later in the day. Cutting off the crust, well that wasn't something I used to do (for sandwiches I ate) because I liked some crust. But I did trim the crust for others. So here we have a patent that combines two (or more) practices that have been around for ages. Is that what makes it new, the idea of combining things into the same sandwich? Did the patent elaborate on whether it was white or wheat bread? Hmmm.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: A crazy patent makes money
WKetel   1/19/2013 1:39:16 AM
NO RATINGS
This may be a "design patent", which I have found is different from a real patent. But here, as always, the magic is in the claims. Peanut butter on both sides is unusual, and probably not "obvious to anyone in the art", and so it can be covered. But other than that, they do look a whole lot like the sandwiches my Canadian friends used to cook over a campfire. I think that they were called "Pudgy Pies." That was long before 1996. So it seems that some uses of the design may be protected by being grandfathered. Of course, we never attempted to keep them for extended periods of time, but rather only till they cooled enough to eat.

bnowak0
User Rank
CEO
re: What were they thinking: A crazy patent makes money
bnowak0   1/18/2013 9:28:02 PM
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Ideas can very much be patented, and you’re mistaking 'prior art' with ‘non-obviousness’. A great example of how broken your knowledge of the patent system is.

Doug_S
User Rank
CEO
re: What were they thinking: A crazy patent makes money
Doug_S   1/18/2013 6:34:53 PM
NO RATINGS
How is this patentable? It is just an idea, and I thought ideas could not be patented. Not to mention the "prior art" from millions of kids who for decades have been pulling/cutting the crusts off their sandwich and pressing together all around the edge with their thumbs. Great example of how broken our patent system is.

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