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Tim R Johnson
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
Tim R Johnson   2/1/2013 9:58:31 PM
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I am not willing to pay a premium for an electric car. If an electric car has a range of 100 miles (I commute 90 miles per day) between charges in the dead of winter at 15 degrees F and costs no more than a ICE car, I will buy it. If not, forget it.

Al_
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
Al_   2/4/2013 10:32:07 PM
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How about a source rather than an anecdotal, unsubstantiated "what-if"? You actually KNOW someone who "abused" the battery thusly, it died completely in these two years, and they refused to replace the battery due to the "abuse" because they could pull the record from the car. Sounds highly unlikely for many reasons to me.

Al_
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
Al_   2/4/2013 10:36:11 PM
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People talked about the original Prius batteries costing $10k to replace (oddly enough the same figure) back when they came out. Now, years later, the very first Prius' are beginning to need new batteries, and they can be replaced for between $1500 to $2500. Sounds like it's worth doing in most cases. As far as "free or low cost service for 100,000 miles" , yeah... right... let me tally up what the service costs were for my Audi A6 Turbo for miles 60,000 to 100,000 (the first 60,000 were under warranty - needed to dump or extend the warranty before 60,000...) Those 40,000 miles were a lot more than $10,000...

Al_
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
Al_   2/4/2013 10:41:14 PM
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"typically halving the range" - a bit of an exaggeration - I'd say more like "at the extreme tail, it MIGHT halve your range..." it's more like 2/3rds your range. Case in point, on a single charge, my Volt will break 50 miles all electric. In close to freezing, it might go down to 33-35 miles... I admit that I've never driven it in sub-freezing levels, but people were never meant to live in such places, much less drive! ;-)

y_p_w
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
y_p_w   2/5/2013 6:35:03 PM
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It did occur to me that it could have been an urban legend. I did a little bit more research, and there are reports that the console warning lights go crazy and inform that one really needs to add fuel before running out. Then it makes sure that the driver knows that there is no fuel. Once someone shuts it down without fuel and attempts to start it, it will give three chances to start with enough fuel before it shuts down and requires an engine code reset. There are reports that people might have been able to get up to two miles on the battery alone, although it progressively lowers speed (maxes at about 18 MPH). So perhaps my original understanding was off. Turns out more detailed reports are that they are designed to keep the battery from depleting. However, running out of fuel is a bad idea. I don't know if Toyota will consider it abuse for warranty claims.

NewStandard
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
NewStandard   2/5/2013 11:04:49 PM
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I absolutely agree, Kris! I'm only arguing EVs relative to ICEs. Moving a person or two at significant speed in a 1-1/2 ton box is energy intensive any way you cut it! Unfortunately, areas like mine have a lot of hills, are hostile to non-motor traffic, and have very weak public transport.

NewStandard
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re: Silicon Valley Nation: Electric vehicles stuck in neutral
NewStandard   2/5/2013 11:12:46 PM
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You expect nothing but improvements and reduced operating costs, and yet aren't willing to pay one penny more to get them. Congrats--I bet you're a "winner" in society's race to the bottom.

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