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curtis.blanco
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re: Android processor core is royalty free
curtis.blanco   2/5/2013 4:05:20 PM
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They probably deliver Pizza after their day job.

KatarinaN
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re: Android processor core is royalty free
KatarinaN   2/1/2013 6:19:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Beyond Semiconductor owns all including commercial rights to the OpenRISC architecture. Furthermore, the BA2 processors are not based on OpenRISC architecture but on much more efficient architecture proprietary to Beyond Semiconductor.

eewiz
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CEO
re: Android processor core is royalty free
eewiz   2/1/2013 5:36:50 PM
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THe initial one time license fee still apply. Royalty/ device sold is free.

krisi
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CEO
re: Android processor core is royalty free
krisi   2/1/2013 4:59:12 PM
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How do they make money if the license is free???

jeremybennett
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re: Android processor core is royalty free
jeremybennett   1/31/2013 5:58:19 PM
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Interesting legal position, given the BA processors are based on the OpenRISC architecture, the implementations of which are licensed under LGPL.

jeremybirch
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CEO
re: Android processor core is royalty free
jeremybirch   1/31/2013 3:51:02 PM
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The beauty about royalty is you will only end up paying significantly for successful chips ie ones you make a lot of and presumably make some revenue from. Paying an upfront fee means you take all the risk and costs upfront and this might force the vendor to make the fee so low to attract customers that it is not viable

daleste
User Rank
CEO
re: Android processor core is royalty free
daleste   1/31/2013 2:27:32 AM
NO RATINGS
The ARM royalty is usually calculated by the foundary such as TSMC. They know which devices have it and how many wafers have been run, so the accounting isn't that hard. Of course, no royalty is easier. It will be interesting to see how much of the pie Beyond can get.

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
re: Android processor core is royalty free
Peter Clarke   1/30/2013 4:19:19 PM
NO RATINGS
One reason people don't like royalties is the costing of counting sales and working out what is owed. So 0% is preferable to any% on that basis.

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
re: Android processor core is royalty free
Peter Clarke   1/30/2013 4:18:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Which ones are the ARMv2 implementations? Those are very old and I were, I think, the Acorn RISC Machine as used in some Acorn computers running RiscOS.

bobbytsai
User Rank
Rookie
re: Android processor core is royalty free
bobbytsai   1/30/2013 3:52:15 PM
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opencores http://opencores.org/project,zpu so many cores, a few patent free arm v2 implementations

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