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donatled
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re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
donatled   2/5/2013 11:36:07 PM
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Most movies I have wasted time and money watching of late need neither 4K nor 3D, they need a script... The cinemas have sufficiently destroyed the movie going experience to send us home & the supply end have some how manged to attribute a fall decline in the market to piracy as opposed to a simple lack of quality product. Somehow the plethora of inbred two-heads chasing some form of wild critter or a house full of bitchy ditzes is seen a suitable substitute for entertainment. Should see a rise in book sales again soon...

old account Frank Eory
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re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
old account Frank Eory   2/5/2013 10:18:32 PM
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Maybe the next big thing is an intelligent agent that seeks out the content each of us might find interesting among all those thousands of dispersed channels. That and the death of so-called reality TV, which has about as much to do with reality as flying unicorns do :)

Bert22306
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Bert22306   2/5/2013 9:15:53 PM
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From what I've read, the movie studios are subsidizing the shift to digital cinema. As they should, since it means huge savings to them primarily. I don't know whether this subsidy is for all theaters, or just the major chains, however. About the comment on the "hassle" of finding decent TV content to watch over the Internet. Using any search engine, and I typically use Webcrawler (just to prove the point that Google isn't all there is on this planet), I can find any number of TV/movie content sites or portals. The portals are essentially search engines in their own right. Beyond the obvious Amazon, Netflix, and Hulu, that is. So pick one or more of these portals, and also use the TV networks' own web sites, and I honestly can't fathom what more TV anyone could possibly watch. This is just to show that the well publicized "solutions," such as AppleTV, GoogleTV, Roku, et al., are HARDLY the answer to Internet TV. They are merely overly-restrictive solutions, and hardly essential. TV content on the Internet is no different from any other content on the Internet. Why assume that TV content must be different? Search it out the same as anything else, bookmark your favorite portals, and enjoy! I use over the air TV (47 channels in my market), I use Internet TV, no cable, no Netflix, no Hulu Plus, and I still have way more content out there than I would ever be able to sit through. To tie this back to the article, I guess I'm saying that if Hollywood doesn't "get" what digital is offering them, they need to wake up.

krisi
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
krisi   2/5/2013 7:58:39 PM
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It is already happening...two movie theaters just went belly up as they could not afford moving from 25mm to digital

BobsView
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
BobsView   2/5/2013 7:27:42 PM
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Forgot to mention Roku. There's got to be another 100,000 free channels on there also for a total of 250,000 sources of content. And Roku makes it so easy to find what you want to watch.

DMcCunney
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
DMcCunney   2/5/2013 7:25:27 PM
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@Bert33506: "Well, the movie theaters we frequent on most Saturday nights have recently converted to the Sony Cinema 4K standard. That's something. Must save the studios a ton of money, not to have to distribute those bulky movie platters (or whatever they're called), no?" Good for the studios, but bad for a lot of others. It's getting harder to find 35MM prints, and new films are increasingly released in digital only. Expect too see a lot of smaller theaters go out of business because they can't afford the $100K+ costs of upgrading to digital projectors to show the new content.

BobsView
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
BobsView   2/5/2013 7:23:26 PM
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"Assuming we always need this "next big thing," it should be proper Internet distribution of TV and movies. With intelligently designed connected TVs out on store shelves. And by the way, we're essentially there already. ***Only no one seems to get this." Bert, I couldn't agree more. My entire viewing experience consists of an Over-The-Air antenna (the way TV was meant to be) and Netflix. I get all the networks and more live sports TV than my neighbors get with Cable. Last year, my neighbor complained that the local cable service blacked out the World Series - unless you had the premium channels. Yet I was freely watching it in HD over the airways. Regarding lack of stuff to watch, between over-the-air TV and my Netflix steaming and DVD account, I have probably 150,000 movies and shows to watch at any one time. And all this for only $16/mo. To be totally honest, I'm never without anything good to watch. If I watched 2 movies a day, 7 days a week, it would take me over 200 years to see everything. I'm not complaining.

DMcCunney
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CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
DMcCunney   2/5/2013 7:21:11 PM
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"The trouble for Hollywood is that consumers seem content to stream movies and TV shows. They don’t want to shell out the money to buy them." "Buying them" implies you'll want to watch the content *again*. How many movies and TV shows have you seen that weren't worth watching the first time? Hollywood makes a huge noise about digital piracy, in the fond believe that if they could only stop people from pirating content, the Promised Land would be in sight, as all of those pirates would instead buy. They wouldn't. They would simply do without. The content is not valuable enough to those people to be worth paying for. The market will pay for value. Hollywood and TV are still struggling with the issue of providing value, and understanding what the market *will* pay for.

GQQSER2
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Rookie
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
GQQSER2   2/5/2013 6:23:59 PM
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You nailed it. My 52 inch TV does not get the use it once did because it is a hassle to find something worth watching. As you said, content being dispersed. Existing TV's do not compete very well with streaming via tablets.

DarkMatter0
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Rookie
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
DarkMatter0   2/5/2013 5:56:34 PM
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Agreed! Digital eye-candy is nice, but if the story (what, we need a story?) isn't compelling, why would anyone want to spend money to watch it, let alone own it.

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