Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 4   >   >>
NimrodO0l1
User Rank
Rookie
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
NimrodO0l1   2/9/2013 1:05:10 AM
NO RATINGS
Digital book, of course :-)

DrQuine
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
DrQuine   2/8/2013 3:19:35 AM
NO RATINGS
Perhaps's Bert22306's original comment contains the solution: projection. Rather than pending a fortune on the display unit, make a good projector and enlarge the image as much as you wish.

DMcCunney
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
DMcCunney   2/8/2013 2:13:17 AM
NO RATINGS
@Gert22306: "From what I've read, the movie studios are subsidizing the shift to digital cinema." They may in the case of big chains. If you are a smaller independent, you are likely SOL. I just saw an online note that a respected independent theater in Boston was doing a Kickstarter campaign to get the funding to convert. They're a "rep house" who tends to show foreign films, classics and the like, and are looking at a future where they won't be able to get film prints, and if they can't show digital, they're gone. They play a vital part in getting films before a discerning public, but *don't* generate the kind of revenue that would make it a studio's while to subsidize them. I can think of a couple of theaters near me in NYC that are likely in the same position. It will bite the filmmakers too at some point - how many pictures get limited release on less than 100 screens because the studio doubts it will be a breakthrough film, but hopes the limited release will build word of mouth that might lead to wider release and popularity? It's precisely the theaters that tend to get those limited releases that may not be able to afford the costs of switching.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Bert22306   2/7/2013 9:34:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Don't know about everyone else, but I read the paper and check the weather over the Internet too. So my interactivity there is limited to clicking on articles I want to read, or a weather radar loop, much like watching Internet TV. Most TV on the Internet is in fact "on demand." So it's interactive in that sense. It's not watched by appointment. The PVR function, if you want to compare it to TV shows stored in a PVR at home, is done by some server "in the cloud." In the US, TV networks and individual broadcasters have shyed away from putting live streams on the Internet, for the most part. In other parts of the world, they aren't so coy. Technically, live streams can be transmitted over your ISP's network. But since I have not watched much of any "prime time" TV live for decades anyway, watching it on demand, via the network's web site or Hulu, is just perfect for me!

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Bert22306   2/7/2013 9:17:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Not to belabor this math, although it is fun math. The pixels as they are defined in digital TV are not individual R, G, and B pixels. That is to say, when HDTV is defined as 1920 X 1080 pixels, this means 1080 full color pixels in the vertical dimension, and 1920 color pixels in the horizontal. Not one third that many. The approximate 8.5 Mpel equivalent of 35mm movie frames, taken through a realistic lens, also refers to full color pixels. Or if you prefer, it refers to just the luminance. Therefore, black and white images from 35mm film, taken on a camera with decent lens, can definitely benefit from UHDTV. As an aside, 100 ASA color negative film itself can resolve about 150 line pairs per mm. That's irrespective of lens. Just the film. This means that each film frame in a movie 18mm X 24mm format can store the equivalent of 38.9 Mpixels, were it not for the limitations introduced by the lens. So UHDTV's 8 Mpel resolution seems very adequate when you take the lens into consideration, where the realistic limit is ~8.5 Mpels, but it hardly approaches what a film frame is capable of storing.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Duane Benson   2/7/2013 7:21:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Bob - I barely use my cable. I mostly have it because it's part of a bundle with Internet and phone. I and my kids watch three or four cable channels and not much else. I've probably watched something on the old-guard networks, maybe a handful of times in the last year. I've hesitated to get rid of the TV portion of the package probably just out of perception.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Duane Benson   2/7/2013 7:16:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Bert - Maybe I'm just cynical, but I think TV is still used differently. The Internet gives the expectation of interactivity where TV is strictly passive entertainment. It's also quite possible that my information is out of date. If indeed, Internet programming can be easily accessed via a remote control, then my argument is invalid.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Bert22306   2/7/2013 2:03:31 AM
NO RATINGS
But Rick, liking PBS doesn't mean you need cable. You can either get your favorite PBS shows online, at this site: http://video.pbs.org/ or you can get them over the air. Now mind you, the overly restricted "connected TV" products you can buy won't get you to that PBS site, or most other TV sites on the Internet. That's why I decided to just dedicate a PC to this role. No need to sit up to a small laptop or tablet screen to watch online TV.

Brutus_II
User Rank
Manager
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
Brutus_II   2/6/2013 11:15:09 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bert - Touché, but alas, I was careful to say "black and white":) Even B&W looks good on HDTV though but would not be worth upgrading to a UHDTV. Those old Star Trek movies do seem to show more detail than when viewed on analog sets(probably unintended).

BobsView
User Rank
CEO
re: The view looks grim from Digital Hollywood
BobsView   2/6/2013 10:15:31 PM
NO RATINGS
There is a fascinating story about the digital restoration of "Gone With The Wind". The original film was shot in Technicolor with 3 cameras, one for each color. The digital processing company was lucky and found a pristine version sealed in a can that was never used in a projector. When they took a close look at the original film, it was off by 5 pixels. So they digitally corrected it. The bottom line, the copy on Blue Ray is better than the original. When I view it on an HDTV, I can see tiny decorative threads in Scarlet's dress that you would never see in the cinema. You can also see the tiny blood vessels in her eyes that you normally would never notice. And this film was released in 1939!!! If you are interested, the complete story comes with the DVD, in Special Features.

Page 1 / 4   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Vetinari Clock: Decisions, Decisions, Decisions …
Max Maxfield
22 comments
Things are bouncing merrily along with regard to my uber-cool Vetinari Clock project. The wooden cabinet is being handcrafted by my chum Bob (a master carpenter) using an amazing ...

Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock

Jolt Awards: The Best Books
Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock
1 Comment
As we do every year, Dr. Dobb's recognizes the best books of the last 12 months via the Jolt Awards -- our cycle of product awards given out every two months in each of six categories. No ...

Engineering Investigations

Air Conditioner Falls From Window, Still Works
Engineering Investigations
2 comments
It's autumn in New England. The leaves are turning to red, orange, and gold, my roses are in their second bloom, and it's time to remove the air conditioner from the window. On September ...

David Blaza

The Other Tesla
David Blaza
5 comments
I find myself going to Kickstarter and Indiegogo on a regular basis these days because they have become real innovation marketplaces. As far as I'm concerned, this is where a lot of cool ...