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Ossian
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re: Raspberry Pi goes low power
Ossian   2/6/2013 8:18:01 PM
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Use a USB Ethernet dongle. If you are not creating a wired network enabled device, then using a USB solution for development is the way to go.

Edward Rivas
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re: Raspberry Pi goes low power
Edward Rivas   2/6/2013 4:45:03 PM
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I don't have a Pi but I am developing a Linux/ARM system and I find the Ethernet to be an invaluable debugging port. How does one access the console or download code without an Ethernet port on the Model A? I assume there is a serial port for tty support. IMO, stripping out Ethernet eliminates one of the most awesome things about using Linux in an embedded application: Rich networking support. But I can see how if you were using Python that this might still be useful. Otherwise, I would think that an Arduino board might be a better choice given that it is real time and lower power and still comes with a massive base of support.

yalanand
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re: Raspberry Pi goes low power
yalanand   2/6/2013 11:27:12 AM
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@Duane, I think the program has been very successful. Many of my friends ordered the kit and are developing very interesting applications using this device. I am glad it released low-power version as-well which will help the developers because they dont have to worry about powering this.

bobbytsai
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re: Raspberry Pi goes low power
bobbytsai   2/6/2013 1:41:33 AM
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have been using it to teach 6th and 8th (5 kids) graders basic python programming. it has good community support with plenty of programming examples. combine it with a few ebay relay boards, switches or stepper mottor drivers and it can be used to teach a bunch of stuff to kids. having volenteered in schools, elementry, middle and high school over the past 20 years (lego robotics, BEST ...) i have found few teacher that would be able to make use of something like raspberry pi unless they are handed a structured curriculum with all materials. with a few mentor, i think it can work. it not an issue finding teacher wanting to provide this type of education but they need help.

Duane Benson
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re: Raspberry Pi goes low power
Duane Benson   2/5/2013 4:52:40 PM
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This is a good modification. There are probably a lot of applications for which low-power is more important than the extra features. The Raspberry Pi was originally intended primarily for educational use as a low cost way to give student programming experience. Does anyone know how successful that part of the program has been? I know quite a lot have been sold, but how many are to educational institutions and how many of those are in use with working curriculum?



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