Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 6 / 7   >   >>
Don Scansen
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Don Scansen   2/20/2013 9:29:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Frank, Thanks for you comments. As always, you provide your own insightful analysis. We agree wholeheartedly about a sudden and unlikely switch to new CPU architecture and instruction set. But there are analysts out there who are selling that as a real possibility. It's all business, of course, but investment analysts would be wise to consider more of the technology side and how it works before giving an opinion on corporate strategies. But we're techies, so what else would we say? Thanks again, Don

Don Scansen
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Don Scansen   2/20/2013 9:29:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Frank, Thanks for you comments. As always, you provide your own insightful analysis. We agree wholeheartedly about a sudden and unlikely switch to new CPU architecture and instruction set. But there are analysts out there who are selling that as a real possibility. It's all business, of course, but investment analysts would be wise to consider more of the technology side and how it works before giving an opinion on corporate strategies. But we're techies, so what else would we say? Thanks again, Don

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
old account Frank Eory   2/20/2013 8:10:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Speculation that the A-series apps processors are stopgaps until the right Intel chip arrives seems ludicrous. Why would Apple abandon it's customized ARM cores, which are already successfully integrated with the GPUs, memory controller, etc. in the A-series devices? It would require a huge savings in die size, power or both, coupled with a substantial performance boost, to justify such a radical change in AP strategy -- not to mention additional costs & risks like reoptimizing iOS for a new instruction set & new CPU architecture, and moving to an AP that Apple's competitors can also buy. It's hard to imagine the potential rewards will be so great as to justify the costs & risks. On another subject, I'm curious what exactly Chipworks means by "custom design" and "manual layout." Certainly there must've been some custom cell designs, maybe even for some logic. We can also see from the photos that some of the blocks have irregular shapes, so a lot of manual effort must've been put into floorplanning and megacell placement & boundary definition of the megacells. But I suspect that within most of the megacells, automatic P&R was used -- especially the GPUs, which are simple rectangles that look like they could have simply been synthesized from RTL and auto P&Rd by ICC or Encounter or whatever digital P&R tool Apple uses. As for routing -- whether within a megacell or at the top level -- it is doubtful a team of human beings made all or even a significant percentage of those billion+ connections manually in a layout tool. A few critical nets maybe, but not much more than that. Custom design of some cells & manually-assisted floorplanning, yes. Full custom chip design and manual chip routing, no, I don't think so.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
old account Frank Eory   2/20/2013 8:10:28 PM
NO RATINGS
Speculation that the A-series apps processors are stopgaps until the right Intel chip arrives seems ludicrous. Why would Apple abandon it's customized ARM cores, which are already successfully integrated with the GPUs, memory controller, etc. in the A-series devices? It would require a huge savings in die size, power or both, coupled with a substantial performance boost, to justify such a radical change in AP strategy -- not to mention additional costs & risks like reoptimizing iOS for a new instruction set & new CPU architecture, and moving to an AP that Apple's competitors can also buy. It's hard to imagine the potential rewards will be so great as to justify the costs & risks. On another subject, I'm curious what exactly Chipworks means by "custom design" and "manual layout." Certainly there must've been some custom cell designs, maybe even for some logic. We can also see from the photos that some of the blocks have irregular shapes, so a lot of manual effort must've been put into floorplanning and megacell placement & boundary definition of the megacells. But I suspect that within most of the megacells, automatic P&R was used -- especially the GPUs, which are simple rectangles that look like they could have simply been synthesized from RTL and auto P&Rd by ICC or Encounter or whatever digital P&R tool Apple uses. As for routing -- whether within a megacell or at the top level -- it is doubtful a team of human beings made all or even a significant percentage of those billion+ connections manually in a layout tool. A few critical nets maybe, but not much more than that. Custom design of some cells & manually-assisted floorplanning, yes. Full custom chip design and manual chip routing, no, I don't think so.

kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   2/20/2013 6:52:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Um, who are you kidding? Apple is clearly on it's way out. They lost the "cool factor" which is all they had going for them. It's over. http://bit.ly/dI3hcF

kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
kjdsfkjdshfkdshfvc   2/20/2013 6:52:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Um, who are you kidding? Apple is clearly on it's way out. They lost the "cool factor" which is all they had going for them. It's over. http://bit.ly/dI3hcF

asic_pal
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
asic_pal   2/20/2013 6:23:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Though it may be difficult I am sure Apple will lic the LTE Ip or work on a custom design with the IP vendor (Qualcom/Intel etc). Otherwise it can not differentiate with competition if it simply buys a chip and plugs it in the device.

asic_pal
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
asic_pal   2/20/2013 6:23:29 PM
NO RATINGS
Though it may be difficult I am sure Apple will lic the LTE Ip or work on a custom design with the IP vendor (Qualcom/Intel etc). Otherwise it can not differentiate with competition if it simply buys a chip and plugs it in the device.

Dave1010101
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Dave1010101   2/20/2013 5:54:56 PM
NO RATINGS
I imagine Apple would need to consider what Intel could offer in terms of process technology and power consumption in the lower nanometer technology.

Dave1010101
User Rank
Author
re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Dave1010101   2/20/2013 5:54:56 PM
NO RATINGS
I imagine Apple would need to consider what Intel could offer in terms of process technology and power consumption in the lower nanometer technology.

<<   <   Page 6 / 7   >   >>


Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST
In conjunction with unveiling of EE Times’ Silicon 60 list, journalist & Silicon 60 researcher Peter Clarke hosts a conversation on startups in the electronics industry. One of Silicon Valley's great contributions to the world has been the demonstration of how the application of entrepreneurship and venture capital to electronics and semiconductor hardware can create wealth with developments in semiconductors, displays, design automation, MEMS and across the breadth of hardware developments. But in recent years concerns have been raised that traditional venture capital has turned its back on hardware-related startups in favor of software and Internet applications and services. Panelists from incubators join Peter Clarke in debate.
Most Recent Comments
Amir11
 
betajet
 
David Ashton
 
betajet
 
zeeglen
 
GSKrasle
 
zeeglen
 
elizabethsimon
 
Bill_Lempesis
Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Special Video Section
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...