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Peter Clarke
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Peter Clarke   2/22/2013 1:05:07 PM
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Always a chance but last time I heard both Intel and Apple owned a significant piece of Imagination. Apple had about 10 percent and Intel about 15 percent back in 2009. http://eetimes.com/electronics-news/4195660/Apple-follows-Intel-tops-up-stake-in-U-K-graphics-provider Of course, those holdings could have drifted down with gradual sell offs since then. But they showed a clear commitment to keeping Imagination alive at the time.

Peter Clarke
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Peter Clarke   2/22/2013 1:05:07 PM
NO RATINGS
Always a chance but last time I heard both Intel and Apple owned a significant piece of Imagination. Apple had about 10 percent and Intel about 15 percent back in 2009. http://eetimes.com/electronics-news/4195660/Apple-follows-Intel-tops-up-stake-in-U-K-graphics-provider Of course, those holdings could have drifted down with gradual sell offs since then. But they showed a clear commitment to keeping Imagination alive at the time.

linuxlowdown
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
linuxlowdown   2/22/2013 11:55:29 AM
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Apple needs to try to erase the memory of history and have large screen billboards erected in every important city location on the planet with the face of big brother Steve telling everyone how awesome Apple products are and that Google is the enemy.

linuxlowdown
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
linuxlowdown   2/22/2013 11:55:29 AM
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Apple needs to try to erase the memory of history and have large screen billboards erected in every important city location on the planet with the face of big brother Steve telling everyone how awesome Apple products are and that Google is the enemy.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:51:02 AM
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BTW, I agree that Apple will probably want to add LTE to the device in the long run, though buying Qualcomm's and attaching it to their SoC using TSVs would be a way to do it without actually integrating the IP. You're wrong in saying they don't have any LTE IP. They actually own 5% of the LTE patent pool through their purchase of Nortel's patents. Of course, owning IP and having the expertise to design an LTE block for their SoC are two very different things. As you say, they'd need to acquire someone for that. The question is, is there really any differentiation or improvement to be derived from doing LTE yourself versus buying a standard part. If ZTE sells a phone with a buggy LTE chip and has to recall a million of them, that's expensive. If Apple did that and had to recall 50 million of them, it'd be really expensive (not counting the publicity damage, which would make the maps thing seem like nothing) Having a better LTE chip doesn't make the phone go any faster, the only thing you can improve upon is power usage. That's more about the process used to make it than the way it is designed. Get an LTE chip from Intel made on a superior process, and you have more of an advantage than you could ever get from a superior design using a TSMC/Samsung/GF process everyone else uses that's a generation behind Intel.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:51:02 AM
NO RATINGS
BTW, I agree that Apple will probably want to add LTE to the device in the long run, though buying Qualcomm's and attaching it to their SoC using TSVs would be a way to do it without actually integrating the IP. You're wrong in saying they don't have any LTE IP. They actually own 5% of the LTE patent pool through their purchase of Nortel's patents. Of course, owning IP and having the expertise to design an LTE block for their SoC are two very different things. As you say, they'd need to acquire someone for that. The question is, is there really any differentiation or improvement to be derived from doing LTE yourself versus buying a standard part. If ZTE sells a phone with a buggy LTE chip and has to recall a million of them, that's expensive. If Apple did that and had to recall 50 million of them, it'd be really expensive (not counting the publicity damage, which would make the maps thing seem like nothing) Having a better LTE chip doesn't make the phone go any faster, the only thing you can improve upon is power usage. That's more about the process used to make it than the way it is designed. Get an LTE chip from Intel made on a superior process, and you have more of an advantage than you could ever get from a superior design using a TSMC/Samsung/GF process everyone else uses that's a generation behind Intel.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:41:35 AM
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Why would Apple want to use the A57 versus designing their own? They designed the A6 for a reason, and it beats dual core A15 which is not bad for their first effort. It isn't much of a stretch to think that Apple could beat A57. Their design target for a 64 bit ARM SoC would probably be different than the Android vendors. Those guys will mostly sell 64 bits as a checklist spec item, like how a quad core CPU is a checklist item for any high end Android phone now, despite little reason for having four cores in a phone. Apple would be more likely to want a 64 bit ARM for Macbook Air (or the rumored TV) Get the 64 bit ARM OS X API out there on Macs, and then a year later stick it in a phone that can connect to a monitor and a bluetooth keyboard/mouse and viola, a full OS X desktop is available when used that way and mobile devices start to eat into PC sales in a big way.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:41:35 AM
NO RATINGS
Why would Apple want to use the A57 versus designing their own? They designed the A6 for a reason, and it beats dual core A15 which is not bad for their first effort. It isn't much of a stretch to think that Apple could beat A57. Their design target for a 64 bit ARM SoC would probably be different than the Android vendors. Those guys will mostly sell 64 bits as a checklist spec item, like how a quad core CPU is a checklist item for any high end Android phone now, despite little reason for having four cores in a phone. Apple would be more likely to want a 64 bit ARM for Macbook Air (or the rumored TV) Get the 64 bit ARM OS X API out there on Macs, and then a year later stick it in a phone that can connect to a monitor and a bluetooth keyboard/mouse and viola, a full OS X desktop is available when used that way and mobile devices start to eat into PC sales in a big way.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:37:00 AM
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Rumor has it that Apple hired almost all the ex-ATI guys that left AMD last fall, so I think doing their own GPU is a foregone conclusion. I'd look for it in the summer/fall 2014 iteration of iPhone, assuming they hit the ground running late last year and have something taped out by Halloween this year.

Doug_S
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re: Apple processors: Designed differently but here to stay
Doug_S   2/22/2013 7:37:00 AM
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Rumor has it that Apple hired almost all the ex-ATI guys that left AMD last fall, so I think doing their own GPU is a foregone conclusion. I'd look for it in the summer/fall 2014 iteration of iPhone, assuming they hit the ground running late last year and have something taped out by Halloween this year.

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