Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 4   >   >>
wishboneash
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
wishboneash   2/27/2013 6:12:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Altera is behind technically compared to Xilinx in 20nm and trying to use process technology to leapfrog Xilinx. It is not difficult to see why they are doing this.

Peter.Ting
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
Peter.Ting   2/27/2013 5:59:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Whats to prevent Intel from been the best ARM isa cpu design and manufacturing co.

DMcCunney
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
DMcCunney   2/27/2013 5:19:03 PM
NO RATINGS
It makes sense for Intel and Altera. As you move into progressively smaller geometries, fewer foundries qualify. Altera wants to move to 14nm for new products. Who else *can* make them? But as you move down into that range, the cost of building a fab rises into the ionosphere. Very few companies can afford to build them at all, and those that can want to be sure a substantial market is there for what the fabs will make. The deal with Altera provides Intel with a chunk of revenue to help offset the design and construction costs of 14nm geometries, and Altera is not a direct competitor to Intel. The question is what Altera has in the pipeline that it might ask Intel to manufacture for them. Intel is essentially in two businesses, design and manufacture. Competitors like ARM are in one: design. Intel has historically designed what it made, but as growth in the X86 market flattens, the question arises of what business will keep those oh so expensive foundries operating at capacity. "It is not Intel's objective to become a general foundry service provider," sounds quite true, but they also need to keep the fabs turning out product and generating revenue 24/7 to justify having them. Juart filling in the corners and mopping up any idle capacity will be attractive. I'm just wondering how firm Intel's insistence that while it *has* an ARM license, it doesn't intend to *use* it will remain. Intel *used* to make ARM CPUs via its former StrongARM division. If someone like Apple inquired about Intel making ARM CPUs at 14nm geometries for them, what do you suppose Intel might say? I can see the design side of the house turning colors and sputtering, and the manufacturing side calling the janitors to mop up the drool.

WSS-T
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
WSS-T   2/27/2013 2:20:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Would this be one of the business negotiation, marketing, and investor/stakeholder PR tactics?

Jack.L
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
Jack.L   2/27/2013 1:57:56 PM
NO RATINGS
On the other hand, Intel has been one of the most reliable companies at consistently hitting their process milestones on time. Then you add in the huge potential performance/cost advantage of a true 14nm node. Those two things together likely equal a lot less risk to forward profits than counting on TSMC.

Jack.L
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
Jack.L   2/27/2013 1:53:10 PM
NO RATINGS
2) With Apple controlling the end product space, it makes sense to target them as a customer. Apple is a big customer to Intel already and while their processors could be considered competitive, they are not a competitor to Intel. That is not true at all of Qualcom who is definitely a competitor. Partnering with Qualcom would mean Intel abandoning a large future market space. That is just not going to happen. 3) Compared to overall Intel revenue, this portion of the market could be small, even at a 100 million+ units/year. A $10 processor at 100 million units is still only $1 billion. Yes a nice adder to the bottom line, but ultimately not huge dollars for a company of Intel's size. The question is whether yield and die size would offer enough cost savings to give them sufficient margin to justify the business. Also need to consider what portion of the power budget is processor and if the impact of Intel allows a premium charge.

Jack.L
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
Jack.L   2/27/2013 1:40:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Intel has an architectural license to ARM though they have stated in the past they will not use it. The question for Intel sales and marketing is is this a good back door method for getting into those companies to sell their architecture?

SKYHAWK
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
SKYHAWK   2/26/2013 11:11:13 PM
NO RATINGS
One word for Intel foundry. "Capacity", oops they are full now.

TarraTarra!
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
TarraTarra!   2/26/2013 10:02:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Morris Chang would be perfect for that!

rick merritt
User Rank
Author
re: Intel to make 14-nm FPGAs for Altera
rick merritt   2/26/2013 9:16:21 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder what percentage of the foundry revenue and profit than 5% might be?

<<   <   Page 2 / 4   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
<b><a href=Betajet">

The Circle – The Future's Imperfect in the Present Tense
Betajet
1 Comment
The Circle, a satirical, dystopian novel published in 2013 by San Francisco-based writer Dave Eggers, is about a large, very powerful technology company that combines aspects of Google, ...

Max Maxfield

Recommended Reads From the Engineer's Bookshelf
Max Maxfield
2 comments
I'm not sure if I read more than most folks or not, but I do I know that I spend quite a lot of time reading. I hate to be idle, so I always have a book or two somewhere about my person -- ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
2 comments
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...