Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
Peter Clarke   3/4/2013 5:31:57 PM
NO RATINGS
@cescharlau It IS possible that wireless chargers are greener than badly designed and badly deployed wired chargers that are left plugged in drawing a little power 24/7. I agree there is the issue of a single piece of equipment made, packaged and shipped versus multiple chargers.

cescharlau
User Rank
Rookie
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
cescharlau   3/4/2013 4:33:22 PM
NO RATINGS
If wireless chargers, through their convenience, catch on and become ubiquitous; and they are standardized to charge a multitude of devices; and if by eliminating the mechanical plug and socket, the wireless chargers have much longer lifetimes than the wall-warts and USB cables they replace: Then might not wireless charges reduce resource waste, and the energy wasted in the manufacture and distribution of countless charging devices that currently come included with almost every commercial electronic device? Perhaps wireless chargers though less efficient at their task, are potentially greener over their lifetimes when all factors are considered.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
Duane Benson   3/4/2013 4:28:24 PM
NO RATINGS
The efficiency question will never go away, but it will become less and less or a factor. Consider the required battery capacity of a phone. Years ago, very large batteries were required. The battery size dropped over time as the electronics became more efficient and the transmit power dropped. Battery capacity took a big saw tooth back up with Smart phones, but it will eventually work its way back down again. My pre-smart phones typically could go about a week without being plugged into a charger. My smartphone needs to be charged every day. Once we work back to that level, then charging energy will be a much smaller factor. There are ways to deal with phantom power too. Consider a system where the wireless charging plate would draw a few micro amps when not charging anything. It may even be possible to completely disconnect it from the wall. I would venture a guess that most corded chargers are just left plugged into the wall.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
krisi   3/4/2013 3:25:20 PM
NO RATINGS
The Y-generation is sensitive green planet, radiation pollution etc. Would young people embrace energy inefficient wireless charging?

agnolus
User Rank
Rookie
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
agnolus   3/4/2013 9:11:42 AM
NO RATINGS
The universal charger already exist: through USB port. I got a smartphone, a tablet and a normal old mobile phone. All got the USB-charger port. I got an USB adaptor for the wall/car... since then I charge only through USB port.

daleste
User Rank
CEO
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
daleste   3/2/2013 4:07:18 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes, we are lazy. Having a pad to throw my phone on at the end of the day is much easier than getting that little micro USB connected. On the other hand, I am very stingy with my money, so I will plug the little connector into the phone rather than pay extra in energy costs.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
Bert22306   3/2/2013 1:09:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Frank, an efficiently designed car, running at 50 mph, requires about 12 to 14 HP to maintain a steady speed. So if the alternator needs 1.5 HP to turn (thanks for the number, I didn't have it at hand), that's a substantial 10-12 percent of the total output of the engine. Car and Driver used to post two figures with their road tests, some time ago. The HP required at 50 and at 70. Obviously, the number is higher at 70.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
old account Frank Eory   3/2/2013 12:11:39 AM
NO RATINGS
A quick search on the subject of mpg cost of running an alternator reveals calculations varying from 1 to 1.5 HP when the alternator is putting out 50 amps -- a substantial load for a passenger car (excluding EVs of course). Let's assume this means a properly working alternator, no belt slipping, etc. On a modest 4-cylinder with 100 HP, we're talking 1-1.5% HP loss to run the alternator at a 50A load. A 5 watt cell phone charger will pull less than 0.5A from that 12V regulator. Let's be generous and call it an amp -- it's still only 2% of the alternator output, which translates to 0.03% of the HP loss due to running the alternator. In the usual manner of engineering approximations, I'll go out on a limb and say that a 0.03% loss of HP translates to a 0.03% loss of mpg and that you will never notice that. So when it comes to charging your phone or even your big tablet in the car, charge away! The cost in extra gasoline is almost immeasurable.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
Bert22306   3/1/2013 10:07:45 PM
NO RATINGS
A one size fits all wired charger would be a good thing, although it goes contrary to the best interests of individual gadget-producing companies. Who would much prefer to add the revenues generated by a proprietary charger, and possible future replacements, to their bottom line. I was astounded, for example, to discover that I couldn't find a replacement charger cord tip to fit an old appliance we had. Radio Shack sells a bunch of these in assorted sizes, and yet not a single one worked. I wonder why. Anyway, that aside, I'd say wireless charging is bound to waste energy compared to wired. Not just to radiation, but also to the extra circuits needed for transmission and reception. You'd think that a load sensing shutoff on a wired charger would be a doable do. Wouldn't be free, but in huge numbers, should amount to much of a price hike.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: London Calling: Forget wireless charging
Bert22306   3/1/2013 9:57:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Peter does make a good point, though. Negligible is true enough, perhaps, but alternators do place a load on the engine. Many years ago now, one of our neighbors had a brand new car, and complained that the battery was running down. The charging light was coming on when the car was running. Since the car was brand new, my first reaction was to tug a little on the fan belt. Yup. It wasn't very tight. A simple adjustment solved the problem. Point being, that alternator wasn't turning, just because the belt wasn't tight. It was in place okay, but it was slipping. That's engine load. I agree also with iniewski. Are we really that lazy?

<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>


Most Recent Comments
Ian Johns
 
Kinnar
 
Kinnar
 
Ian Johns
 
traneus
 
Ian Johns
 
David Ashton
 
Ian Johns
 
resistion
Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Tired Old iPad 2 vs. Shiny New iPad Air 2
Max Maxfield
8 comments
I remember when the first iPad came out deep in the mists of time we used to call 2010. Actually, that's only four years ago, but it seems like a lifetime away -- I mean; can you remember ...

<b><a href=Betajet">

The Circle – The Future's Imperfect in the Present Tense
Betajet
5 comments
The Circle, a satirical, dystopian novel published in 2013 by San Francisco-based writer Dave Eggers, is about a large, very powerful technology company that combines aspects of Google, ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...