Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Oldest First | Newest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
Bert22306   3/8/2013 9:52:00 PM
NO RATINGS
Mostly, this kind of story just aggravates me. First, because people think that something so obviously great has to be made to look "cool," and then also that this has to be about money. EE Times just finished publishing a survey that showed that NASA and Boeing were two of the top rated organizations to work for, according to US school grads, no? Is it a huge leap among kids to get that these jobs require STEM education? I can't see how. Also, what's wrong with geeks and nurds? I mean what, as opposed to airheads or neanderthals? The government can stay out of this, for the most part. The popular media might have more of a part, by cutting back on its emphasis on things shallow and trendy.

EREBUS0
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
EREBUS0   3/8/2013 10:49:27 PM
NO RATINGS
While I agree we should not have to make engineering "cool", we do need to address the overall image of engineers and scientists in our society. Our TV image is one of evil scientist, rogue engineers, nasty hackers or just really boring people. Thank you holliwood. The truth remains that engineering is not a career for the masses. You have to want to be an engineer. No amount of STEM classes will change that fact. Yes we can slowly change the image, but the only way to address the future shortages is to find those young people who have the interest and desire to be a scientist or engineer and facilitate their path to become one. If we make the path attainable, then more will make the journey. Just my opinion.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
old account Frank Eory   3/8/2013 11:33:31 PM
NO RATINGS
I doubt that many young people with talent in STEM really care much whether engineering is perceived as "cool." The ones I know through my college student daughter were always good at math & science, since grade school, and liked (or didn't dislike) those subjects. As they got into high school and started thinking about college majors and careers, they naturally had questions about engineering -- some of them asked me about what I do and how much do I like it -- and none of them had a clue just how vast the engineering profession is and how many different career possibilities an engineering degree can lead to. But the far bigger issue they now face as college graduation approaches in the next year or two is whether or not they will actually get to be working engineers -- whether anyone will offer them an engineering job, and in what city will that job be and what is the cost of living there relative to the salary? To Bert's comment, at some level it does have to involve money, because these young grads want to know that they have chosen a profession in which it will not be impossible to get a job, or that if they do get a job, it will pay enough that they can have the kind of lifestyle they're hoping for -- to be able to someday buy a house, drive a decent car, raise a family and so on. Nobody wants to study that hard, get those good grades, possibly take on student loan debt, and then graduate with that shiny new engineering degree only to discover that there are no jobs for them, that every engineering job listing requires a minimum 3-5 years experience which they obviously don't yet have and which they will never get if no company ever hires fresh-outs. The question asked in the headline should not be "how do you show engineering can be 'cool'?" but "how do you show that engineering can be a career and not just a hobby?"

rwik78
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
rwik78   3/11/2013 1:03:20 AM
NO RATINGS
I prefer people loving Science and Technology for something deeper than a cool factor.

Comfortable
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
Comfortable   3/11/2013 3:23:25 PM
NO RATINGS
I would venture to say that virtually everyone that has a successful career in engineering started their pursuit because of a "coolness". If it isn't cool, they will be out of engineering shortly after starting. At least that's how it works in America, Europe and Britain.

any1
User Rank
CEO
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
any1   3/11/2013 4:56:15 PM
NO RATINGS
I think that you are right Frank. In some sense it is about the money. Our best and brightest want to be hedge fund managers, not engineers. When I look at women in STEM I see them clustering in a few areas like chemical, biomedical, and environmental engineering. So there is something to the fact that as the numbers of women rise in these fields even more women are attracted to them.

RDRD
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
RDRD   3/12/2013 11:48:29 AM
NO RATINGS
Due to globalization (read China, India, Russia, Eastern Europe, Brazil) STEM has become too competitive. The need to come up constantly with new ideas and products has never been so high, and salaries in the West due to the high government taxes are under pressure, as an engineer in the West is still costing 2 to 3 times as much as in the upcoming countries. As a lawyer, or physician the professional field is evolving much slower and pressure is only local, not global.

IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
IDontUseTheForumSoWhyAmIForc   3/12/2013 6:00:38 PM
NO RATINGS
In order to make engineering 'cool' to the masses, take a page out of the 'Hollywood Blockbuster Film Formula' #1 Start with a car chase to grab their attention #2 Add multiple explosions ... then add more. #3 Wave a flag #4 Have a gunfight (even better if accompanied by explosions) #5 Show a love interest #6 Add a few more explosions (while waving a flag) #7 Show impossible technology saving the world #8 Have the love interest blow something up #9 Have another 10 thousand round gunfight that magically stops the moment the bad guy dies. #10 Kiss the girl (surrounded by blown up wreckage, bullet holes and a flag waving in the background) Follow this time tested formula and you're guaranteed to make engineering 'cool' ... either that or $150 million at the box office :)

Michael.FlieslerQA
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
Michael.FlieslerQA   3/13/2013 10:45:47 AM
NO RATINGS
Engineering can be made "cool" for the mass market by showing the connection to companies which make cool stuff: Google, Facebook, Apple, for example. Also Ford, GM, and Tesla. This connection must be made early in education (prior to high school), in order to inspire students to start on the path of STEM education. Engineering school is hard, and relatively few engineering grads will hit the start-up jackpot, so their passion must be fed by the intrinsic rewards of working in a creative profession, working on cool stuff (with tangible results), understanding how things work, and solving difficult problems.

Reagan.Thomas
User Rank
Rookie
re: How do you show engineering can be cool?
Reagan.Thomas   3/13/2013 5:38:43 PM
NO RATINGS
"This connection must be made early in education" Absolutely. My sister is a VP of Engineering at Boeing - in a recent STEM related interview, she stressed how growing up with a father who was an architect, industrial designer and always working on "cool" things was critical to her early interest in engineering. Like you, she believes that the "cool" of STEM needs to be introduced at a young age. I think that means schools need to have neat demonstrations, builder projects and so on to encourage an interest in design, making and innovation.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Carlos Bueno

Adventures in Userland
Carlos Bueno
Post a comment
Editor’s Note: Excerpted from Lauren Ipsum: A Story About Computer Science and Other Improbable Things, author Carlos Bueno introduces us to Lauren and her adventures in Userland. ...

Max Maxfield

Tired Old iPad 2 vs. Shiny New iPad Air 2
Max Maxfield
9 comments
I remember when the first iPad came out deep in the mists of time we used to call 2010. Actually, that's only four years ago, but it seems like a lifetime away -- I mean; can you remember ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...