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mhrackin
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
mhrackin   4/12/2013 4:54:44 PM
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As one who had a small part in Marty's team in the "batcave" I can attest that we started working on TRUE cellular networks in 1970! I've posted elsewhere (on the blog with the Marty Cooper interview video) in more detail. I have to admit I was skeptical about whether we could ever figure out the right hand-off processes.

Kevin Neilson
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
Kevin Neilson   4/6/2013 8:07:20 AM
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Remember when one could buy a fake carphone antenna to make it look like you had a phone built into the car? That would hardly be a mark of prestige now. In 1973 I think if you'd asked people to predict what they'd see in 2013, I bet they'd have predicted we'd have landed on Mars and would have (huge) HAL-like computers and robots to wash the dishes, but they probably would never have guessed that even children would own phones that made the Star Trek communicators look bulky and primitive. It's so hard to forecast.

Bert22306
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
Bert22306   4/5/2013 8:29:08 PM
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Exactly. And beyond that, although perhaps not so popular in the US yet, a whole lot of people around the world get their Internet broadband connections at home, as well as on the go, via 3G. Soon 4G, no doubt. So that's why my emphasis on what transpired 40 years ago is not on that walkie-talkie looking gadget itself, but on the word "cellular."

old account Frank Eory
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
old account Frank Eory   4/4/2013 9:20:38 PM
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As remarkable as the evolution of the mobile phone was from a "brick" to a pocket-sized device, I find it even more remarkable how rapidly the pocket-sized phone of the mid-2000s evolved to today's pocket-sized connected computers with their incredibly wide variety of apps -- and that for many users, the fact that these devices can also make voice calls is almost incidental.

selinz
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
selinz   4/4/2013 6:18:22 PM
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I remember my first bag phone (`90?). I was almost embarassed to use it when I went to the airport one time. Not beacuse it was big, but because it seemed "boasty."

rick merritt
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
rick merritt   4/3/2013 11:36:30 PM
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Good point! The story generated an email noting many of the fundamental technologies behind cellular came out of Bell Labs. More engineers to credit.

Upal_Sengupta
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
Upal_Sengupta   4/3/2013 10:43:44 PM
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Thanks for commemorating the anniversary of such an important technology that most of us take for granted these days. Reading this story really does make me reflect on my own career, and I am grateful that I had a chance to at least play a (very) small part in this industry. As an engineering student at the University of Illinois in the 1980s, many of my friends went on to work at Motorola after graduation. I was fortunate enough to join some of them a few years later and worked on battery and system power management technology for mobile phones during some of the “glory years” in the 1990s. Now, as an applications engineer at TI, I still see the influence of the mobile phone on our work at the IC level every day. The system-level need drives the component technology, and new components enable better system solutions. The circle of life… There have been tremendous changes over the past 40 years – the components available, the design philosophies we follow, the engineering work environment, and of course the economics that drive the industry as a whole. One lesson we can we learn from history is that sometimes, brilliant ideas can take a long time to really pay off. It was nearly twenty years after this first phone call before mobile phones started becoming commonplace. It was another ten years before they became ubiquitous. During that time, entire new segments of our industry were created. Batteries, displays, antennas, connectors, and of course semiconductors have made huge strides over this time period. I expect that Mr. Cooper could not have fully envisioned the scale of the revolution that would be launched because of his invention. He and his team have changed the lives of billions of people as a result.

Bert22306
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CEO
re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
Bert22306   4/3/2013 8:57:04 PM
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Scary-amazing that it's already been 40 years. But I don't see the actual innovation that of a cell phone per se. The telephone instrument looked very much like a walkie-talkie, and we had those for decades prior. No big deal there. We already knew how to tie wireless sets to the telephone network. The problem to solve was to achieve scale. And for that, the super-duper invention was that of cellular communications. In cellular (this very much relates to the article on TV white spaces), you shorten the RF range enormously, and you reuse the same RF frequency channels over and over again, in a small area. Not city-wide, but only a few blocks at most. Most importantly, for this to be practical, you have to automate the frequent re-tuning necessary, as you jump from one cell to the next. That's the huge innovation. The phone instrument is just about immaterial. Cellular provides ubiquitous RF coverage for any type of comms. Fashionable iPhones are but one of the uses of this great innovation.

rick merritt
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re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
rick merritt   4/3/2013 6:09:32 PM
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A personal reminiscence: I was oblivious to the first 15 years of the cellphone. In 1988, I was a tech reporter in Hong Kong, noticing the CT2 (cordless telephone, second generation) handsets. They could call out but not receive calls, so users also wore a pager. Later models had integrated pagers and were the object of conspicuous consumption for messengers. When I returned to the US in 1993 my realtor had a car phone. I thought, "what a luxury!" Within six years I was issued a Nokia 3210 candy bar handset, my first work phone. I thought I died and went to heaven. A phone in my pocket! A few years back I was upgraded to a Blackberry--email at my fingertips--Wow! Now I carry an iPhone 3G--the Web in my pocket. Amazing! Along the way fortunes have been made and lost. Cities of Foxconn assemblers have emerged in China. And now China is making its own cellphones and cellphone chips as my colleague Junko Yoshida writes on a weekly basis.

chanj0
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CEO
re: Cellphone’s 40th anniversary is no midlife crisis
chanj0   4/3/2013 4:54:23 PM
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Happy 40th Anniversary to both EE Times and Cellular Technology. I can't help agreeing with the importance of system engineering as the cellular technology is invented. With a system perspective, technology will go to next level and more products can be build better and faster. One of the many great features of cellular technology is frequency reused. The system capacity can be increased by shrinking the size and shape of a cell. What a brilliant idea. Today, some of the key features of the cloud based technology is data redundancy and all-on service availability. Both can be achieved by leveraging different OS services, DNS, Apache Cassandra. I am with Rick. I am looking forward to what the world is like when all these great technologies invented in the 70s' are towards the retirement age. Thank you, Rick for the article and video.



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