Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
albertatiffany
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
albertatiffany   9/24/2013 4:40:53 AM
NO RATINGS
"Since 11% fewer engineers are working on communications equipment, which is a strong-hold market for FPGAs, I'm guessing there are fewer such projects, thus less demand for FPGAs." Agree with your point. here is my site.

betajet
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
betajet   4/29/2013 9:46:50 PM
NO RATINGS
(continued) While FPGAs in principle are clean and simple, they have a pretty steep learning curve in practice. It can also be difficult to place them within a design organization. To take the best advantage of FPGAs, you need to have the flexibility to move functionality between hardware and software. Having one person doing digital hardware design, device-level software, and FPGA design simultaneously is one approach, but even if you have that designer he or she will be overwhelmed unless the design is clean and simple. Most organizations have separate hardware and software people, and where to place FPGAs can be problematic. Some people say FPGA design should be easy for software people -- after all, Verilog even looks like C. In fact, the similarity in syntax is misleading, because hardware design is a very different beast from software. Some say it's better to do FPGA design in VHDL precisely because it looks different from C. The design challenges of FPGAs -- particularly for a company that doesn't already have an FPGA guru -- adds enough risk that many would rather make do with SoCs. I don't think the FPGA vendors realize how hard it it for a new user to use their tools. Their marketing materials all say how fast and easy it is, so there seems to be some denial going on here. JMO/YMMV

betajet
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
betajet   4/29/2013 9:45:54 PM
NO RATINGS
Duane, I really enjoyed your Design West talk "FPGAs: I know nothing... yet" which illustrated some of the challenges a newbie has getting into FPGA design. As someone who designs FPGAs professionally, I've gotten used to the eccentricities of FPGA design languages and tools and don't appreciate how bizarre it must seem to the new user. Back to the topic, I think it's mostly a question of cost. Everybody is trying to drive down cost, so if there's any way to get the functionality onto a SoC, management will cajole engineers into doing it even if it's ugly. With increasing SoC performance, there are fewer functions that have to be in an FPGA to meet performance and/or latency requirements. A number of SoCs have some very interesting features for handling functions that would otherwise require an FPGA, such as TI's PRU (Programmable Real-Time Unit) available on the BeagleBone's Am3358/9 and NXP's SCT (State Configurable Timer). Plus, some small SoCs are so cheap that you can add another one in place of an FPGA. (to be continued)

the lavender fan
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
the lavender fan   4/29/2013 8:58:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Since 11% fewer engineers are working on communications equipment, which is a strong-hold market for FPGAs, I'm guessing there are fewer such projects, thus less demand for FPGAs.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
Duane Benson   4/29/2013 4:32:44 PM
NO RATINGS
The drop in FPGA use is the most surprising to me. My initial thought was that this could be an indicator of increasing adoption of 32 bit MCUs; that more FPGA functionality was moving to software. That would make some sense, but the drop in current FPGA use over the same time frame is considerably more than the increase in 32 bit use. I suppose it could be that the 32 bit processors are getting more capable at the same time and thus are more able to take on complex functionality, even if the numbers aren't changing much.

docdivakar
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
docdivakar   4/29/2013 2:20:45 PM
NO RATINGS
@Bert22306: I think the author is attempting to get his point across that enterprise networks and small to medium data centers are shrinking. This could explain the 11 percent fewer engineers working on networking equipment. If you put this in perspective of what is evolving in software defined networks, the job number can get worse in the coming years. You are quite correct in your critique on buzz words -the industry is awash in it! MP Divakar

Bert22306
User Rank
Author
re: DESIGN West: Taking embedded market's pulse
Bert22306   4/25/2013 8:44:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Wait, if there are 11 percent fewer engineers working on communications and network equipment, and you attribute this to "the cloud," then what do you guys think "the cloud" consists of? Water vapor? :) (Pretty clever, if I may say so myself.) Possibly, what you mean is that you get some economies of scale, if you consolidate some of the previous enterprise network services in a fewer number of giant "cloud" companies. Could be. The opposite side of that coin is that a whole lot more gadgets, appliances, etc., are now "connected." So one would expect that engineers knowledgeable about comms and networks would be in greater demand for the makers of these end products. From my perspective, the use of RTOSs may have declined as faster processors have made embedded Linux work just fine for many real time applications. I very much doubt that real time performance matters less than before. Also, ultimately the use of buzz words make a fashion statement. For example, designing web apps is "so yesterday." But designing apps for "the cloud," now you show you're really with it.



Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Most Recent Comments
andybe
 
Bruzzer
 
Bruzzer
 
CB_EE
 
uv-linkedin
 
CB_EE
 
CB_EE
 
uv-linkedin
 
CB_EE
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...