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Diogenes53
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
Diogenes53   5/12/2013 10:25:42 PM
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Seems to me once "good enough" (and cheap) replaced "best" as the key metric, the Japanese semiconductor industry was sunk. They simply cant move fast enough to change an entire culture. If automobiles had a Moore's Law moving every 18 months, the Japanese auto industry would also be on its last legs. Tech is unforgiving: have a hiccup, miss a cycle, and you are dead. Autos do not: GM and Chrysler survived near-death experiences, and Toyota overcame the accelerator debacle. No tech company could have done that. Only reason to buy a Japanese fab is to buy a customer you couldnt get any other way.

SiliconAsia
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
SiliconAsia   5/10/2013 4:04:39 PM
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People will pay less than 10% of original equipment price and ship it out to China and outsource the manufacturing at less cost. Knowledge/know-hows of product design can stay in Japan but does not make sense to have these old machines sitting there doing nothing. Also for MEMS, you need more than these old machines to make things you want to make. It 's additional CAPEX Japan does not want to invest for no ROI.

junko.yoshida
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
junko.yoshida   5/10/2013 2:55:46 PM
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any1, you are absolutely correct, I think, by saying that many Japanese companies delayed too long in "restructuring" their semi operations. Renesas is no longer the owner of its own company and it does not control its own destitny. Fujitsu, keen on getting rid of its semi division, isn't interested in proposing anything new to reverse the direction either. Herd mentality is exactly where Japanese companies are in now. It is, however, an opportunity for chip companies in other countries.

any1
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
any1   5/10/2013 1:10:49 PM
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Junko, what is your opinion on this trend? Conventional wisdom says dump all of your old fabs. But conventional wisdom is often wrong. It seems that many Japanese companies delayed too long in "restructuring" their semiconductor operations. But now there seems to be a mad dash to exit. Sort of a herd mentality that says if company X is selling then we need to sell as well before it's too late. But it's been too late for some time now for conventional strategies. Throw out the accountants and put some engineers in charge. It's time to try a contrarian strategy. Don't bet the whole company on it, just part of it.

Antonyt
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
Antonyt   5/10/2013 4:23:18 AM
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It does seem odd that foreign companies are interested in the fabs but someone in Japan is not. I agree that the Japanese companies have to expand their focus a bit and try to wring as much (second-tier) value out of these facilities as they can. I am assuming that this lack of effort on the part of Japanese companies is not a technological problem so it may be a failing of the capital markets in Japan. Very strange.

any1
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
any1   5/9/2013 6:14:26 PM
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I agree, this article is correct in that MEMS, discrete power, and many other devices could be manufactured in these legacy fabs. But instead of selling them to other companies already in these businesses, why not develop in house capabilites and products in these areas instead of selling all of these fabs at way below replacement cost? They should take the millions that they would have to write off as losses and invest that money in themselves while they still can. They could save at least some of these fabs. Whatever happened to Japanese companies taking the longer view towards their futures? This trait was one of the strengths that made them great.

snapdragon7
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
snapdragon7   5/9/2013 1:45:51 AM
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The ailing semiconductor manufacturer in the article is fujitsu semiconductor which is trying to sell off its 300mm MIE fab in japan

joshxdr
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
joshxdr   5/8/2013 10:29:32 PM
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The old Micron fab in the article is the Nishiwaki fab I am referring to (wish I could edit comments)

joshxdr
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
joshxdr   5/8/2013 10:27:45 PM
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Meant to say 1995...

joshxdr
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re: Japanese fabs, anyone?
joshxdr   5/8/2013 10:26:21 PM
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The Nishiwaki fab at one point was the benchmark fab for the TI DRAM business. They consistently had the best yields of all of TI's fabs. That was around 2005. Nishiwaki is a country town with poor access by road and train. The train into town chugs along with a diesel engine (most trains in Japan are electric powered).



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