Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
eewiz
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
eewiz   5/28/2013 12:00:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Remote desktop apps like teamviewer, already can connect to any desktop from any mobile device, which is decent enough for most purposes. The advantages in the case of cloud virtualization are not clear.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
Duane Benson   5/28/2013 4:22:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Security could certainly be a big advantage for corporate and government users. In stead of needing to secure hundreds or thousands of individual PCs, a few larger systems could get dedicated attention to security. Of course, then a lot of vulnerability would be concentrated in one place. Eventually, I expect that a lot of corporate and government computing will go this route. It may be the only way to really be secure from cyber attacks.

chanj0
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
chanj0   5/28/2013 5:02:12 PM
NO RATINGS
One of the many limitations of tablet and smartphone is workspace. The screen size is not going to be a lot bigger than 10". In addition, the screen resolution is going too be limited because of price concern. I am happy to hear opinion from heavy CAD users.

DMcCunney
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
DMcCunney   5/28/2013 5:11:54 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm amused by how everything old is new again. When I first got involved in computing in the late 70's, the personal computer was just beginning to become established, and the original IBM PC was starting to appear on corporate desktops. The model was that work was done on a big central computer, and users interacted with it through terminals. Now we're back to the centralized computing paradigm again, with the cloud serving as the centralized computing resource, and data and the applications that manipulate it actually residing remotely, with the user's machine becoming effectively a terminal accessing the remote resource. I've been using remote desktop solutions for years, with things like AT&T's VNC software. The work is actually done on a remote host, and only the data needed to display the desktop on my screen is transmitted, with a protocol designed to minimize the bandwidth required. The key here is interactive graphic applications, and the higher amount of data that must be sent to the user's device to display the current state. The concerns I can see relate to what device the user has. If I'm running a highly graphic application, I may be able to access it via my device, but can I effectively use it? One of the issues I have with smartphones is that much of what I do graphically really needs a much larger display than any practical phone will have. I see the same only more with this sort of solution. I may be able to get to that big graphic application from my phone, but I probably won't be able to really use it. The underlying concept looks valid, but I'm less enthusiastic about the cross-device aspects. There are a variety of things I simply wouldn't try to do from a phone or tablet, even if those devices could connect to the resources that did it.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
Duane Benson   5/28/2013 9:28:23 PM
NO RATINGS
So many things do cycle through. I rode the decentralized computing wave and now, as you noted, things are going back the other way. I'm a little more optimistic about phone and tablets at this point though. My vision is that the "dumb terminal" is really just a wireless keyboard, mouse and display set. The smart phone in your pocket, in a few years, will be powerful enough to handle just about any task needing local data and will be able to wirelessly connect to the dumb terminal on any desk. The phone will have all of your connections and configurations and whatever data you feel needs to be with you at all times.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Author
re: Cloud-based virtualization goes mobile
old account Frank Eory   5/31/2013 7:43:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Indeed everything old is new again. Way back in the mid-90s, we had dumb X terminals at home that connected to our Unix network at the office via ISDN. They had no storage and couldn't even boot without the network connection. The "cloud" was just the engineering network at the office. In more recent years -- for many years -- I have used VNC to remote connect to PCs & Linux computers at work from wherever I am, with whatever machine I happen to have with me. That includes VNC on my iPad. Not having an actual mouse on the iPad makes things a bit clumsy for doing things on a Windows or Linux machine via the iPad, but once you learn VNC's clever ways of handling mouse emulation (even 3 button mouse emulation), it's manageable. But none of this is new.



Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST
In conjunction with unveiling of EE Times’ Silicon 60 list, journalist & Silicon 60 researcher Peter Clarke hosts a conversation on startups in the electronics industry. One of Silicon Valley's great contributions to the world has been the demonstration of how the application of entrepreneurship and venture capital to electronics and semiconductor hardware can create wealth with developments in semiconductors, displays, design automation, MEMS and across the breadth of hardware developments. But in recent years concerns have been raised that traditional venture capital has turned its back on hardware-related startups in favor of software and Internet applications and services. Panelists from incubators join Peter Clarke in debate.
Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Special Video Section
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.