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rich.pell
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
rich.pell   6/29/2013 3:50:40 PM
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Snakes are actually very popular as pets, so I don't think I'd be so quick to dismiss this as an intentional joke. Whether the collar itself is actually practical or not is another question entirely!

ccalvin
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
ccalvin   6/21/2013 7:05:42 PM
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While the collar-to-the-snake attachment is non-trivial, I think that I would prefer that tether (401) be rigid.

Battar
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
Battar   6/11/2013 6:09:34 AM
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The text of the abstract and claim shows up the apparent inability of patent attorneys to construct a coherent sentence in English. They gain little respect among engineers whose job generally includes writing technicial specifications which are used to actually construct the invention. But why submit the application? How would you enforce it? I don't believe there is a market for these devices, and I would hesitate to take up a legal battle with someone whose hobbies include taking pet snakes for walks. (or slithers)

anon6223816
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
anon6223816   6/10/2013 7:25:23 PM
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The USPTO pays for its operation with its fees. I suspect the examiner found no prior art. It serves a useful(?) purpose, and therefore has utility. Cha-ching goes the cash register -- thank you Mr. Inventor for playing today. Please play again. Bring money. ;-). I'd like to see the inventor put one of those on a reticulated python, or a black racer. "Slither", indeed.

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
BrianBailey   6/10/2013 5:59:23 PM
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Right - why would anyone care, so just issue it.

Duane Benson
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re: What were they thinking: Slithering a snake
Duane Benson   6/8/2013 8:45:06 PM
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I really wonder how some of these patents can be issued with a straight face. Nonsensical technical patents are one thing. It's not good, but I can understand how something gets through that sounds viable to a laymen but is nonsense to a highly skilled engineer. But a snake collar? From my perspective, it's either an intentional joke from the patent office, involved judicious amounts of alcohol or shoes that someone just plain doesn't care.



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