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jjphillips
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
jjphillips   7/12/2013 9:12:16 PM
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@olaf.barheine - what type of medical device?  Pleora's NTx-U3 is being designed in to a number of x-ray detector panels, for example.

jjphillips
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
jjphillips   7/12/2013 9:09:42 PM
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@paspl - if you need high bandwidth, Pleora's NTx-U3 can achieve 3Gbps with the FX3.

Karnik
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
Karnik   6/26/2013 12:27:45 AM
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For FX3 in particular: a) Regardless of GPIF II configuration, SPI can be used for booting. b) In absence of hardware SPI, other peripherals (I2C, I2S, or UART) can be used, depending on the use case.

paspl
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
paspl   6/25/2013 2:59:46 PM
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The Figure 3 shows a Machine Vision design. But to achieve the maximum bandwidth on the FX3, the GPIF must be configured in 32-bit. In this case the spi controller seems not available (need to develop a manual spi (with poor performance)

Karnik
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
Karnik   6/24/2013 6:50:56 PM
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USB3.0 is capable of supplying more power as compared to USB2.0. It depends on the design how much current it needs to draw. USB3.0 controller by itself takes very less power and at the same time can go into very low power states to conserve power when not in use. USB3.0 has two additional low power states (on top of those in USB2.0) that save power even when the design is actively transferring data. So, overall an optimized low power application is possible with the right USB3.0 controller.

przemek
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
przemek   6/18/2013 7:57:04 PM
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That's interesting---what do you mean by 'USB 3.0 takes FAR too much current'? the host is capable of supplying 1.5A but the endpoint can use less, and it should be able to connect in low-speed mode and take as little current as it needs---isn't that the case?

Olaf.Barheine
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
Olaf.Barheine   6/18/2013 3:58:06 PM
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So what alternative would you suggest instead? In fact, I am just looking for a solution for a medical device that will send much data to a PC.

Youself
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
Youself   6/14/2013 2:26:18 AM
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forget it... USB 3.0 takes FAR too much current. Non starter for anything with a battery in it.

David_shi2013
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re: Leverage USB 3.0 for machine vision
David_shi2013   6/14/2013 1:36:43 AM
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Great article, new USB of the version will bring more covenient to IT customers.



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