Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
jsharris
User Rank
Rookie
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
jsharris   6/21/2013 5:32:38 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree, I have found digikey much more useful than datasheets.

monle
User Rank
Rookie
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
monle   6/21/2013 7:40:56 AM
NO RATINGS
I completely agree that DATASHEETS.COM is spam. When you search for a component there for which they don't have a matching datasheet, they display dozens of links to advertisement sites or other junk stuff. And once you find a datasheet, it is usually not the original one, but manipulated.

Dd1230
User Rank
Rookie
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Dd1230   6/21/2013 4:37:18 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm in Australia. I use Farnell often. it's easy to use and most of time the pictures there quite clear. The parts held there may not be as many as digikey. http://uk.farnell.com/

seaEE
User Rank
CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
seaEE   6/21/2013 2:04:52 AM
NO RATINGS
Speaking of confessions, am I the only one out there still hoping that AltaVista will regain its glory days? As far as searching for parts on the internet, if I search for a TI regulator, the datasheet ought to shop up near the top of page one. Maybe the semiconductor companies can partner with the search engine companies to make it happen. I like Digikey and Mouser also for part searching. Newark can also be useful.

patrick.mannion
User Rank
Staff
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
patrick.mannion   6/21/2013 1:44:02 AM
NO RATINGS
Hey Sean, I think the 'bane of the Internet' may be a bit of a stretch:) Lots of pretty bad stuff out there. Anyway, Datasheets.com is actually a partnership between us and Silicon Expert and is set up a service for engineers/procurement professionals to provide an independent source of product info from many distributors and suppliers, and then allow a good deal of comparative analysis before buying. We really do think it's one of the better independent (ie: none distributor run) sources, but of course we may be biased or flat out wrong. So please, by all means offer some suggestions for better ones you've used or could recommend, and maybe why. That would be very helpful to the other members. Thanks!

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Duane Benson   6/20/2013 10:38:24 PM
NO RATINGS
Digikey is generally the first place I go when looking for datasheets. They probably cover 80 - 90 of my datasheet needs, as well as most of my component purchases. The one challenge I do seem to get from DigiKey comes with parts that don't have clear part numbers or parameters - headers and other connectors, for example. In the catalog days, it was very easy to just page through, looking at the pictures to get close. That's much more difficult with an online catalog.

JeffL_2
User Rank
CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
JeffL_2   6/20/2013 7:26:21 PM
NO RATINGS
It's the best out there, even at that it's not perfect. Try using it to pick switching regulator parts for simple boost or buck applications and you'll see what I mean. You ought to be able to specify a desired input and output voltage and let the DATABASE select the parts that meet the spec. Instead they have you manually multiselecting possibly hundreds of ranges that overlap the voltage you actually wanted in the first place, and if you fail to hold down the control key for even one keystroke you cancel everything you entered and have to start over, in that one situation they seem to have created the absolute HARDEST way to get what you're looking for! But considering how nicely set up everything ELSE is I guess it's just the exception that proves the rule.

DCH0
User Rank
Rookie
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
DCH0   6/20/2013 6:14:30 PM
NO RATINGS
My first choice for datasheets is Digikey. Easy to search and it turns up parts that are actually available. www.digikey.com

JeffL_2
User Rank
CEO
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
JeffL_2   6/20/2013 3:37:09 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm still surprised how many people either don't know about or appreciate the utility to the engineering and general technical community of the following site, maybe they don't understand that the premise of "calculators" gets extended at the high end to include full functional simulation of various physical phenomena, see if you don't agree: http://www.martindalecenter.com/Calculators.html

SEAN.NICKEL
User Rank
Rookie
re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
SEAN.NICKEL   6/20/2013 12:36:30 PM
NO RATINGS
I couldn't agree more. datasheets.com is the bane of the internet for electrical engineers. The fact that it would even be listed as a "useful search engine" by this blog post not only damages the article's credibility, it hurts eetime's legitimacy. I know datasheets.com advertises here and even sponsors some "content". However, that doesn't mean eetimes needs to advertise for a site that is actively trying to make the web WORSE for engineers.

<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Curiosity Killed the Cat (Just Call Me Mr. Curiosity)
Max Maxfield
23 comments
My wife, Gina The Gorgeous, loves animals. She has two stupid dogs and two stupid cats. How stupid are they? Well, allow me to show you this video of the dogs that I made a couple of years ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
13 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).