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kfield
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Some require license
kfield   9/25/2013 12:13:08 PM
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Just a comment, that some of these services require a license (like Google Scholar)

No Gizmo
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
No Gizmo   6/26/2013 9:48:42 PM
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http://www.alldatasheet.com/ works for me.

Kristin Lewotsky
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Kristin Lewotsky   6/26/2013 9:00:04 PM
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Good site, Duane. thanks for recommending it. Another excellent writing reference, although in print, is "The Elements of Style," by Strunk and White.

anon7632755
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
anon7632755   6/26/2013 4:42:56 PM
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findchips.com is pretty great.

khoney
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
khoney   6/25/2013 7:34:54 PM
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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned findchips.com. I use it all the time to find which distributors have parts, and if a part numer (or partial part number) pops up, the link takes you to the distributor page that generally has the datasheet.

didymus7
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
didymus7   6/25/2013 7:14:59 PM
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If this were truly set up as an independent source of information for engineers, why do we have to register? That the usual method for email harvesting.

Duane Benson
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Duane Benson   6/24/2013 5:11:11 PM
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I used to search for parts on Google, but that's where I found all of my spam. I don't recall the sites, but I always seemed to get links that pretended to have the info, but just linked to other sites that linked to other sites... Then I gave up on Google. Over the weekend, I've been experimenting with DigiKey, Datasheets and Mouser - running parts from my BOMs through. I did find an electrolytic to not be on Datasheets and a few parts to not be on Mouser. I tend to select parts based on what I can buy at DK, so I would expect to find all of the parts there. Another site that I find quite useful is: http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/errors.html It's about grammar, not technology, but, though I value function over form, form does help with good communications. This site covers all of those little things like "affect vs. effect:" that I ignored while back in school.

Robotics Developer
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
Robotics Developer   6/23/2013 1:56:10 AM
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I have found both DigiKey and Mouser work really well for me. I have used Datasheets.com and was not impressed. Sorry have to agree with others here on this one.

darthbedder
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
darthbedder   6/22/2013 11:53:43 PM
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Mouser is where I always go first for parts and datasheets. For live pricing and availability when I don't find it in Mouser, I use Octopart, a specialised parts search engine that gives you real time pricing from several vendors on the same component. The hard work of finding obsolete parts info I leave it to Bing.

old account Frank Eory
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re: 10 useful science and engineering search engines
old account Frank Eory   6/21/2013 9:12:50 PM
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Thanks for publishing this list Kristin. I've used several of these sites, but there are others I had never heard of. Like you, I also have had good results with Google scholar to weed out everything that is *not* the journal article or academic publication I'm looking for.

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