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Dan Mitten
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re: Where does residential phone go?
Dan Mitten   8/24/2010 8:37:59 PM
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I dropped our copper service in the spring and moved to a self administered VoIP system over Verizon FiOS. Cell coverage is just too unreliable in our home, to be without something other than cell service. Additionally, I find a regular phone has a much better ergonomic feel and better sound that's welcome on extended calls. A dialpad apart from the handset is mighty nice, too. I expect that home phones will be with us for quite a while.

Steve Armil
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re: Where does residential phone go?
Steve Armil   8/24/2010 8:24:38 PM
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Our landline is for the family. To call the family or the home, there is one number, and you can hear the ring anywhere in the house. The alternative is to cycle through each of four cell numbers to get one of us. Cell numbers are not group or location based. Landline voice quality is better. I have poor hearing, and a landline call is always more intelligible. I agree with the power outage advantage. Not all cell towers have power backup. We have both cell and landline, and will continue to have both.

ttt3
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re: Where does residential phone go?
ttt3   8/24/2010 5:03:21 PM
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I think the arguments here are not quite as strong as they may seem. My iPhone seems to be able to pinpoint where I'm at on the integrated google maps to a a much finer granularity than "50 to 100 meters" - it generally will show my position to within a house or two on my street. Also, the "power going out" argument is somewhat weak in that, the cell phone has a battery (allowing it to be used without residential power for a considerable amount of time), and I believe the cell phone tower probably has a backup power source (or could have one) as well, so usage without power should not be a benefit of the land line. The only positive I can see for the land line is the ability to work in areas with poor reception. If you live in town, this is usually not an issue.

emklaus
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re: Where does residential phone go?
emklaus   8/24/2010 3:56:16 PM
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If you live in an area where the cell providers service is good there's little reason to have both a cell and a land line. I've always felt that someone should offer a base unit (perhaps bluetooh enabled) into which you could drop your cellphone and it would drive all the wired phones in your home.

old account Frank Eory
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re: Where does residential phone go?
old account Frank Eory   8/16/2010 5:46:04 PM
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As much as we all love our cell phones, there is a certain feeling of security in keeping that old land line phone that always just works. Most of our phones are cordless, but I keep one corded phone too -- it's the only phone that still works when the power goes out!

deyyoung
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re: Where does residential phone go?
deyyoung   8/16/2010 1:07:56 PM
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I ditched my landline phone shortly after "portability" was allowed (that's been ~7 years ago?). It took [local carrier] over a year to finally port my landline number to my cellphone! I've never looked back, never had problems with my cellphone where a landline would have been more beneficial, and never switching back to [local carrier] for anything.

phoenixdave
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re: Where does residential phone go?
phoenixdave   8/16/2010 12:39:27 PM
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In the States, you can transfer the land-line phone number you may have had for 20 years to a cell phone, which makes the transition much easier. Most cell plans include local and long distance service, which duplicates the land-line and extra long-distance carriers. Another case of overlapping functionality.

prabhakar_deosthali
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CEO
re: Where does residential phone go?
prabhakar_deosthali   8/16/2010 11:16:50 AM
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It is your home phone by which somebody can trace you, get your address and contact you as the phone directory is published only for these land lines. Some of my old friends have been able to contact me after many years only because I have this ubiquitous apparatus whose number has not changed for more than 20 years. No attempt has been made to publish a directory of mobile phones in any country. and with mobile , so many companies offer so many attractive plans every month here in India that you are not likely to keep the same mobile number over time. This will of course change when number portability option will be available.

Sheetal.Pandey
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Manager
re: Where does residential phone go?
Sheetal.Pandey   8/15/2010 11:01:55 PM
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Yes its a common thinking that a home phone is something extra on the monthly bills. But I think the home phone will always stay. I think your cell phone can dies on you but home phone will never. In many countries home phone bills are considered as address proofs.

Bhola_#1
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Rookie
re: Where does residential phone go?
Bhola_#1   8/14/2010 9:04:22 PM
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I agree with your comment why pay extra if we are getting same benefits with just wireless devices around. Even though we are in advancing in communication era we still have some issues such as dead zones stuff. One of reason I am paying for my landline is that since my wireless carrier donot have signal due to dead zone in the area where I live. So, either I stop/change my wireless carrier by paying extra 250$ or just have a landline that is cheaper.

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