Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
Peter Clarke   12/3/2010 5:06:18 PM
NO RATINGS
If you have enjoyed this thread you may also be interested in reading Simon Barker, who is a PhD student who is also running a business (see Student Entrepreneur: Fives reasons why PhDs are made for business).

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
Robotics Developer   12/3/2010 3:59:03 AM
NO RATINGS
I have a slightly different perspective having a BSEE degree and a few decades of experience. I am currently working on a MS in Robotic Engineering part time and have found a few things to be true. 1) Waiting a long time before returning to school is very difficult due to the loss of higher math skills due to non-use. 2) It takes a LONGGGG time part time for a masters degree. 3)It is expensive as many employers do not fully pay for advanced degrees for their workers (and often require the employee to put up the money up front). Consider the masters while looking for work right post BS degree. If you find a company that you are interested in that pays for advanced degrees then by all means, go to work and continue the degree. If you can't find work (given the economy) consider staying in school and getting the masters. If at all possible, strive to get into internships at companies of interest every summer / winter break. Good luck!

t.alex
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
t.alex   12/3/2010 2:48:34 AM
NO RATINGS
Maybe you can try working for 1-2 years and reconsider again. It may not be Master in Engineering any more, but something else :-).

Test_engineer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
Test_engineer   12/2/2010 2:45:31 PM
NO RATINGS
Yo DLaa, you're becoming what is commonly called a "professional student". Get outta that classroom and into the workplace. Experience trumps diplomas/degrees anytime, anywhere. Learning to deal with idiots on the job is an acquired skill that no college can teach.

ukzw
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
ukzw   12/2/2010 10:47:58 AM
NO RATINGS
I don't agree with Frank's comment, I'm a PhD doing product design and development in a company. It's true many companies won't hire people to do pure research. So my position is embedded software enginner and my main duties are D&D. However, my PhD degree does make me a unique role in the team to do some "Research", such as new algorithm design ... My suggestion is get some industrial experience first, then you will understand which field you are going to pursue higher degree, and a higher degree in the right field will help your EE career a step higher.

jjdraw
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
jjdraw   12/1/2010 5:44:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Switch to law or medical NOW while you still have the chance !!!!!!!!!!!

gsdg90
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
gsdg90   12/1/2010 5:29:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Second rate people tend to hire third and fourth rate employees due to their own insecurity. First rate engineers/managers tend to want to surround themselves with the best and brightest, even if that means they are not the smartest in the room. Advice from small-minded people is spoken from insecurity rather than the benefit of the advised. Pursue/don't pursue your education based upon what you love to do. The money and the happiness will follow.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
old account Frank Eory   12/1/2010 5:16:59 PM
NO RATINGS
DLaa, my observation is that most EEs who do product design & development start working after they get their BSEE, then some percentage of them go on to get an MSEE one class at a time and have their employer pay for it. It is almost unheard of to find a PhD doing product design & development -- the PhD degree clearly identifies you as a researcher with a specialized area of expertise, and there aren't nearly as many industry job openings for pure research as there are for product design.

r3son8tr
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
r3son8tr   12/1/2010 3:08:34 PM
NO RATINGS
Here is a disadvantage: many companies will consider you to be overqualified for entry-level jobs, especially if the area of specialization of your degree isn't an exact match with what the company needs.

r3son8tr
User Rank
Rookie
re: Masters and PhD degrees worth it?
r3son8tr   12/1/2010 3:06:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Unless you want to go into pure research or teach, I suggest you work first, then let the company pay for your advanced degree, if you even really need it. Personally, and as an EE Manager, I haven't found that advanced engineering degrees are necessary - it's better to be a generalist. In the few cases where I did hire an MSEE, they would stay for a year or two then leave to try to find a position that fit their specialization. I would suggest you consider an MBA or MS in Management instead since that will make you more employable in the long run.

<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Recommended Reads From the Engineer's Bookshelf
Max Maxfield
2 comments
I'm not sure if I read more than most folks or not, but I do I know that I spend quite a lot of time reading. I hate to be idle, so I always have a book or two somewhere about my person -- ...

Aubrey Kagan

Have You Ever Been Blindsided by Your Own Design?
Aubrey Kagan
37 comments
I recently read GCHQ: The uncensored story of Britain's most sensitive intelligence agency by Richard J. Aldrich. The Government Communication Headquarters (GCHQ), Britain's equivalent of ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
2 comments
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
15 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...