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CCarpenter0
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Re: Training Orthotics
CCarpenter0   6/30/2013 11:21:16 AM
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Maybe a better example would have been training the muscles of the hand for touch typing :-) .  In my imagination, this would be done with something like a pair of "gloves" that would gently pressure the fingers into reaching for the right keys until, after a month or so, they were comfortable with the motions involved.

 

rick merritt
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Re: Training Orthotics
rick merritt   6/29/2013 9:30:39 PM
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Wow, you are really jumping into the far future. I can't even imagine how a computer would anticipate the next note and signal the fine motor movements to move to the right spot on an unfretted instrument.

 

It's a huge step just to make useful something like Project Glass which just aims to be a voice activated Google search agent.

 

 

CCarpenter0
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Training Orthotics
CCarpenter0   6/29/2013 7:41:15 PM
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I'm intrigued by the possibility of orthotic devices that would help a student learn to -- for example -- play the violin.  Would such things qualify as a "wearable computing" device?

It takes a good deal of plain old muscle conditioning to play a musical instrument (or any number of other skills), and I can imagine a device that would fit over the hands and "guide" them during practice sessions until the muscles of the hand were comfortable and conditioned to the various movements required. 

Meanwhile -- the time when implanted computing is practical will be with us shortly so we won't have to take it off to have a shower :-)

RichQ
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Re: Where's the energy?
RichQ   6/29/2013 3:20:28 PM
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I still use a landline. Cell reception is inadequate where I live. I use a wristwatch, too. Its easier to read than taking out my phone or tablet to see the time. And it it were to monitor my heart, it would be even more valuable to me, especially since the heart attack.

But, hey, perhaps it is old fashioned. So put the IoT device into a copper energy bracelet that helps balance your Chi. That will never go out of style.

rich.pell
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Re: Where's the energy?
rich.pell   6/29/2013 3:10:53 PM
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Wristwatch?  Didn't they go out with landline telephones?  :)

RichQ
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Where's the energy?
RichQ   6/29/2013 2:12:18 PM
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Funny, we were just talking about this over at Microcontroller Central in Duane Benson's blog Create Internet of People Devices.

Depending on how you define "computing," personal IoT devices may well be a source for many wearable computing products. Your wristwatch, for instance, could double as a heart monitor. Your shoes would track your physical activity and help advise you of how many calories you have burned.

One of the things that needs consideration in wearable computing is: what is the energy source? Energy harvesting shoes are one possibility. Another is clothing with solar collectors built in. Biothermal electric generators are still another possibility. All of these are currently in development.

kfield
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Memory devices
kfield   6/29/2013 11:24:20 AM
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Thanks Rick for posting this. I was particularly intrigued by the discussion of wearables as memory devices--but one can't help but wonder if that is completely a good thing or not. Already I am over-reliant on my smartphone for phone numbers, email addresses, etc. and without access to that information, I simply do not even know my own mobile phone number. 

rick merritt
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Call to the wearable pioneers
rick merritt   6/28/2013 7:51:03 PM
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If you have been among the small group of people trying to pioneer wearable computing, I'd love to hear what you have learned. Join the conversation!

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