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DrFPGA
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The Next Phase Is...
DrFPGA   7/24/2013 3:57:22 PM
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What we need, I think, to get to the next phase in DIY evolution is a better approach for code sharing. If we could get most DIY developers to use some common interfaces (Software interfaces), test platforms, and documentation think of the massive wave of new designs that would be enabled. Much like the wave of Zombies in World War Z, the DIY development trend would become unstoppable! 

geckoelectronics
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New world for hobbyists
geckoelectronics   7/7/2013 1:45:23 PM
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SchmartBoard adapters are the real deal; they're actually much cooler than you'd think. I plan to use with a MSP430 microcontroller.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Self learning
Max The Magnificent   7/5/2013 7:07:31 PM
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## There is a lot happening in the self learning electronic development kits.

I agree -- especially over at SparkFun (www.SparkFun.com). I believe that they are one of the fastest-growing companies around. They do everything from organizing soldering classes to development kits to robot vehicle competitions -- plus everyone I've chatted to from SparkFun seem to be real nice folks.

I was worried that electronics hobbyism (is that a word?) was dying out, but this sort of thing gives me a lot of hope.

elctrnx_lyf
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Self learning
elctrnx_lyf   7/5/2013 12:24:33 PM
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There is alot happening in the self learning electronic development kits. Certainy these tools should be a value add to develop circuits with colppex smt components which may not be soldered easily.

79Scout
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Aruduino shield
79Scout   7/5/2013 11:20:36 AM
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I could picture using one of these shields to develop a nice efficient high power led driver interfaced with the arduino. Most of the led drivers I've been finding seem to be SMT which is kind of hard to breadboard at least for a beginnering with little equipment. Though I do need to pick a good soldering iron up before I go getting the boards. But having the source for an arudino shield made board and the SMT to DIP adapter makes planning for it easier. So thank Schmartboard

Rich

JayD030
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Re: New world for hobbyists
JayD030   7/4/2013 11:34:00 AM
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That was the XMP and YMP I think, the ones that looked like a big C that is extruded vertically. They reason they were C shaped and used wirewrap was so that the backplane interconnects could be as short as possible. Not to be discriminatory but the job was usually filled by a smaller sized woman as they could fit in the confined space easier and had to pay attention to not miswrap a connection. I remember a story about one woman having a million wraps with no mistakes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray_X-MP

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray_Y-MP

betajet
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Re: New world for hobbyists
betajet   7/3/2013 3:36:44 PM
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The Cray-I was announced in 1975.

I don't think Cray-1 backplanes were exactly wire-wrapped, but all connections between boards were individual twisted pairs driven by differential ECL with proper termination to avoid reflections.  Cray-1 clock frequency was 80 MHz, so it had a 12.5 ns clock period.  The twisted pairs had precision lengths to provide the correct delay.  If the line was long enough, the signal would go into the next clock cycle and the twisted pair acted like a pipeline register.  Wire makes a great delay line, because it doesn't vary much with temperature or manufacturing process.

Here's the Wikipedia article on Cray-1 with pretty pictures: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cray-1

I've used twisted pair wire-wrap for 20 MHz clocks, and I believe you can go up to about 100 MHz with differential ECL as long as your signal and ground pins (or differential pins) are close enough.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: New world for hobbyists
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2013 1:29:52 PM
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@feanorgem: The Cray supercomputer backplanes were wire wrapped.

Around what timeframe are we talking here, and what was the maximum clock frequency they would be able to support using thsi technology?

JayD030
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Re: New world for hobbyists
JayD030   7/3/2013 1:04:59 PM
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The Cray supercomputer backplanes were wire wrapped. It would take them weeks to do a complete one.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: New world for hobbyists
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2013 8:01:43 AM
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@Garcia: I remember that too... because I did it not so long ago!!

Looking back, I think I learned more creating functional test programs for PCBs than doing anything else in my career.

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