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JanineLove
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Re: Problem solving
JanineLove   7/26/2013 4:28:09 PM
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Frank: problem solving skills and analytical thinking SHOULD be skills looked for on a resume.

JanineLove
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Re: Head Nodding
JanineLove   7/26/2013 4:27:19 PM
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in addition to understanding nodding, the funny story also goes with not tripping over your own ego. And taking risks. That situation could have worked out very badly for him.

Frank Eory
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CEO
Re: Problem solving
Frank Eory   7/17/2013 7:42:25 PM
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I completely agree. But for a new grad, "problem solving" skills aren't likely to be the keywords that the automated system is looking for when screening resumes. So in addition to having a skill and a passion for solving problems, I think it's wise for a new EE graduate to have some of the expected acronyms and buzzwords on their resumes as well -- just to make sure the resume will make it to the stage where a human being actually looks at it.

MeasurementBlues
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The engineering profession
MeasurementBlues   7/17/2013 3:34:06 PM
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I've written and argued about this many times going back to Is engineering a profession? in 2006. There, I say that you can become an engineer without an advanced degree, although a mater's degree helps. Also, you don't need certification to work as an engineer, even as a consultant. Try doing that as a doctor or lawyer, or even as an electrican or plumber.

But, engineers do get hired for their skills and often engineers are not interchangeable, at least not i nthe short term. Compare that to, say nursing, which requires a four-year degree but nurses can and do switch off tasks every day.

We do consider engineers as "white-collar professionals," do we not?

So I ask you, is engineering a profession?

JanineLove
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Re: Good Advice...
JanineLove   7/16/2013 4:18:04 PM
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@Charles.Desassure: Having taught some college students and knowing many HS aged ones, here, I think is the challenge you have mentioned: "But realize that some of these problems will not be solved in one day, a week, or sometimes months." Students today understand immediacay very well. I wonder how we can teach them determination and patience?

JanineLove
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Re: Advice for New Engineers
JanineLove   7/16/2013 4:14:00 PM
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In regards to @docdivakar's comment: Are EEs having trouble getting jobs out of college? Anyone know? Most of the companies I speak with in our industry say they have trouble finding good people, especially those with RF training.

burn0050bb
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Freelancer
Problem solving
burn0050bb   7/15/2013 3:44:22 PM
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I think that problem solving, and the love of it, is more important than which language or discipline an engineer should choose. I have learned many languages since I started problem solving.

 

Kinnar
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CEO
The Funny Story
Kinnar   7/13/2013 3:42:40 PM
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Yes, actually the funny story is really not a funny story, it has many aspects covered in a short case. There is a glimpse of Teamwork, Belongingness to the Parent Company, ability and availability to help others and many more. But still the is a question mark in my mind Do HR Policies and Practices really can detect and appreciate these kind of instances.

Charles.Desassure
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Manager
Good Advice...
Charles.Desassure   7/13/2013 11:32:52 AM
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Positive advice like the one shared within this article will be helpful to any student who is seeking an engineering education.  I have the opportunity to work with high school students through a STEM Program and advise college students who are interested in the area of engineering and computer science.  My advice is the same; one must be willing to solve problems.  But realize that some of these problems will not be solved in one day, a week, or sometimes months.  The ability to work with others is very important, and possessing communication skills is always at the top of the list.  The ability to take ownership of a project is very important too.  I also encourage students to think about a life career, not just think about a job.

_hm
User Rank
CEO
Cross disciplinary skills
_hm   7/13/2013 11:24:38 AM
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Coming age will need cross disciplinary skills for most professions. Some engineers needs to acquire degree in medical field and vice versa. As time pass, it may need to acquire knowledge in other branches of engineering and low and accounts.

You can get most out of you as engineer, if your goal is to begin small startup with few similar minded members. Here, you can fulfil your dreams and gift some solutions to world. This can be very rewarding in all aspects.

As for monetary terms, if you are in first 1 to 3% in any profession or discpline, you earn as much money as you desire.

 

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