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rich.pell
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Re: Organized sensors
rich.pell   7/17/2013 12:13:36 PM
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This is likely to be just the tip of the iceberg. Imagine the possibilities when these "trillion sensors" are combined with things like "big data," mobile, visualization and gamification etc.  For example, one of many intriguing possibilities is that of "self quantification."

Tom Murphy
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Re: Why not a gazillion?
Tom Murphy   7/17/2013 11:05:54 AM
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DocDivakar:  I'm glad I'm not the only one here with a healthy dose of skepticism.  Whether it's 50 trillion or 1 trillion, I think folks need to remember that a trillion is a very large number. While I certainly think it's possible to make use of 250 sensors per person or more, the cost-effectiveness often proves to be the difference between what we could do and what we actually accomplish.  Personally, I'd rather see an end to world hunger and universal education before we start ramping up to trillions of sensors.

docdivakar
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Re: Why not a gazillion?
docdivakar   7/17/2013 10:52:04 AM
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@Tom, we have already crossed several billions of sensors in mobiles. In India alone, there are close to 800 million handsets. Of course not all of them are smart phones with sensors but the worldwide market is touching a billion. The high end phones have as many as 15 sensors in them. The low end smart phones which are already proliferating in the developing economies tend to have less but will easily cross the billions of sensors number nonetheless.

What I do take issue with is the unrealistic number like 50 trillion that I have heard mentioned before in one of the sensors conferences. Granted there will be sensors every where as proclaimed by the Internet of Things proponents, I find it very hard to believe reaching 50 trillion. If that number is reachable, we have to ask ourselves one simple question: what is each sensor going to be priced at? The entire world economy produced a GDP of ~$75 trillion in 2012! That leads me to believe that these trillions of sensors better be priced at $0.01 each!

Thoughts?

MP Divakar

rick merritt
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Tomorrow's tatttoo parlor
rick merritt   7/17/2013 9:45:57 AM
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Great blog, David.

Thanks for pointing us to this trillion-sensor event. It's another way of looking toward the future of ubiquitous computing people have been seeing ahead for some time now.

I recall the keynote at IEDM last year showing academic work on tattoo-ed ICs. Strange but true. Imagine the world far beyond tablets this takes us to.

See http://www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1280227

 

JanineLove
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Re: Printed sensors on skin
JanineLove   7/17/2013 9:41:52 AM
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This concept of senors on the skin reminds me of when RFID first came out. I was at an IMS show many many years ago, and someone was demonstrating how an RFID tag was used to track a cow. I turned to him and asked, and how long do you think it will be before people want to insert these in people? babies? He looked absolutely horrified....

Sanjib.A
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Re: Printed sensors on skin
Sanjib.A   7/16/2013 10:55:02 PM
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@Susan: That is a fantastic commercial. Thanks for sharing! :) Hope this doesn't happen. :)

Yesterday I was sharing the same topic (about printable sensors on human skin) with a few of my colleagues. One person who is working on making functional safety compliant products and always concerned about "failures" and "FMEA"s promptly asked: what if such a sensor which would gather important health related data & transmit to doctor's monitoring device somewhere is remote place malfunctions? Would it not cause unnecessary stress for both? shall we then have redundant sensors then? :)...unfortunately we had to stop our conversation there :)

Tom Murphy
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Why not a gazillion?
Tom Murphy   7/16/2013 5:50:36 PM
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A trillion?  Really?  Let's get to a billion first, then 10 billion, then ask me again.  I've heard way too many optimistic forecasts of the future that never came true.  One trillion would be about 145 sensors for every person on the planet, all connected.  It's connecting them that's tricky.  On the plus side, we probably wouldn't need mobile phones anymore. 

 

junko.yoshida
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Re: Organized sensors
junko.yoshida   7/16/2013 5:13:05 PM
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LarryM99, I think you are spot on. The issue is how the industry can turn a trillion sensors into the organized, networked sensors -- to get data, information and intelligence that are useful.

It is the technology that lets people not just read the data collected by a trillion sensors, but makes sense of all. 

We are sitting only at the very beginning of what might become a revolution.

Susan Rambo
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Re: Printed sensors on skin
Susan Rambo   7/16/2013 5:10:32 PM
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Reminds me of that Washington Mutual commercial (remember Washington Mutual?): The bankers are scanning customers' heads, after first stapling a barcode to their foreheads.  Great commercial, maybe a little too true...



 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: David!!! Hurray!!!
Max The Magnificent   7/16/2013 4:41:30 PM
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@David: I will ping them to respond.

Be gentle ... but firm :-)

I await in dread anticipation :-)

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