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junko.yoshida
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Whom should Lenovo partner with?
junko.yoshida   7/17/2013 11:03:21 PM
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So, if it ain't NEC, who should Lenovo parter with to attack the global market? Or can they do it all on teir own.

Tom Murphy
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
Tom Murphy   7/18/2013 6:33:46 PM
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Those NEC rumors really never made much sense to me. I think Lenovo could either go it alone, or team up with China-based manufacturers. Why wouldn't it go that way?

junko.yoshida
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
junko.yoshida   7/18/2013 6:37:11 PM
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For Lenovo to make a big splash in the saturated U.S. smartphone market, Lenovo teaming up with another Chinese vendor is likely to get little traction and little notivce. 

I had thought earlier that Blackberry wouldn't be a bad choice, but thinking about the state of where Blackberry is today...well, not so much.

Tom Murphy
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
Tom Murphy   7/18/2013 6:47:49 PM
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I see your point, Junko.  I suppose Nokia would be a logical partner -- it has global brand recognition and, let's face it, the Windows thing isn't setting the world on fire. 

mcgrathdylan
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
mcgrathdylan   7/18/2013 7:17:50 PM
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Do you really think that Lenovo requires a partner to make headway in the U.S. smartphone market? Lenovo already has brand recognition in the U.S. (I am typing this comment on a Lenovo laptop right now). Can't Lenovo go it alone?

junko.yoshida
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
junko.yoshida   7/18/2013 7:35:12 PM
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Maybe I am wrong about that...but you know, when Lenovo broke into the PC market in the United States, we all knew its background --- IBM heritage.

So, my question is how well consumers know Lenovo, and whether they regard it as the go-to brand for their next smartphones...

Tom Murphy
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
Tom Murphy   7/18/2013 9:11:20 PM
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I think you were right the first time, Junko. While Lenovo could go it alone, or with a China-based partner, it would gain immediate global recognition behind a major brand.  What it did with the ThinkPad was to acquire the brand and use that to promote its own version.  Maybe it could do THAT again...buy a major phone brand and create phones under that.  Other Chinese companies have done that, too.  Want a Maytag? It's a Chinese brand.

Now...could it buy RIM and go in a new direction with the brand...I think so.

chanj0
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Re: Whom should Lenovo partner with?
chanj0   7/18/2013 8:04:10 PM
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The shipment of Lenovo laptop proves the brand is well recognized in a positive way. I certainly believe they can go alone to the world market. My concern is whether consumers will seem them as a laptop choice more than an alternative of tablet/ smartphone. There is no doubt a great marketing team is necessary.

resistion
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Smartphone consolidation so soon?
resistion   7/18/2013 12:50:05 AM
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Also a sign of commoditization so soon? Oh-oh!

junko.yoshida
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Re: Smartphone consolidation so soon?
junko.yoshida   7/18/2013 1:05:58 AM
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Definitely, resistion. Commoditization is coming down faster than ever, affecting practically everyone in the mobile phone market.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: Smartphone consolidation so soon?
mcgrathdylan   7/18/2013 12:51:14 PM
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I think we are going to see a lot more of this. Everybody and their mother of course wants a piece of the white hot smartphone market. And of course everyone does want a smartphone. But how many competing vendors can survive? Especially when only Apple and Samsung are making any money at it.

eewiz
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Japanese companies
eewiz   7/18/2013 3:47:44 AM
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Sad to see many of the once-mighty Japanese companies gradually becoming irrelevant.

@resistion..

commoditization.. sure but that doesnt seem to affect Apple and Samsung.. Atleast for now. 

Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Japanese companies
Sheetal.Pandey   7/18/2013 6:58:48 AM
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There is huge competition in smartphone market. Every phone company has brought out a smartphone in the market. Users have so many choices even price wise. The Apple and Samsung seems to be in continuous war for maintaining or attaining the top spot. Its difficult. DEfinitely NEC would have taken this step for right reasons. Afterall business is all about mone.

junko.yoshida
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Who killed NEC's smartphone business?
junko.yoshida   7/18/2013 8:24:07 AM
I'd say that NEC had brought this onto themselves. However, there have been a lot of chatter back in Japan, blaming it on NTT Docomo.  

The Japanese telecom giant's new mobile business strategy, reportedly focused on promoting smartphones made by Sony and Samsung, appears to be the final nail in the coffin on NEC's smartphone operations.

I blame NTT Docomo for a number of other reasons -- such as its inability to establish itself outside Japan, while tightly controlling a so-called "Docomo Family."

Docomo for years dictated features of handsets and chips developed by the Japanese suppliers (those who are a part of the Docomo Family). The company made them jump through hoops. 

In the end, many Japanese vendors who got too focused on supplying to Docomo were left standing with little resources to spare for the markets abroad. 

 

jaouadnet
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Re: Who killed NEC's smartphone business?
jaouadnet   7/21/2013 7:46:03 AM
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I added my opinion, Mr mcgrathdylan 

Do you really think that Lenovo requires a partner to make headway in the U.S. smartphone market? Lenovo already has brand recognition in the U.S. (I am typing this comment on a Lenovo laptop right now). Can't Lenovo go it alone?

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prabhakar_deosthali
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Re:
prabhakar_deosthali   7/21/2013 2:44:03 AM
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In my opinion, Lenovo cannot do it solo in the Smartphone market. So, if not NEC then it has to find another partner to enter into the smartphone business and not just the partner biut one with a strong brand value like IBM Thinkpad was in Laptops when Lenovo took that business from IBM

 

Kinnar
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NEC gone now only Japanese Payer is Sony
Kinnar   7/21/2013 3:22:08 PM
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Japanese stack is essential in electronic product design segment, the presence of the Japanese players have shown the quality and durability of the electronics products. NEC is doing good in the display market. Sooner or Later displays will also be driven by android. Google is providing a versatile operating system. So it is a big question why NEC has walked out of the Android based products segment. As NEC is out of the Android based products now only Sony is a major Japanese player in this segment.

selinz
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Re: NEC gone now only Japanese Payer is Sony
selinz   7/27/2013 5:22:29 PM
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Well, Casio is still making lots of high tech watches... Perhaps they'll turn a watch that's a cell phone!

Kinnar
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Re: NEC gone now only Japanese Player is Sony
Kinnar   7/28/2013 12:24:36 PM
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Yes you have made a very valid assumption, but it is not expected from Casio in near future, infect Casio was very much involved in an earlier era before the invention of Smartphone in design and development PDAs but they never came back again with a phone functionality associated with it, that can make them Smartphone manufacturer.

junko.yoshida
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Re: I wonder why they decided
junko.yoshida   7/24/2014 1:41:07 PM
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This is a year old story...but simply put, NEC did not have any market presence or market share outside Japan.

Many Japanese handset vendors did well as long as Docomo was growing... When Docomo said "jump," they all asked, "How high?"

But the sad truth is Docomo never expanded its business beyond Japan, hence practically almost all of the Japanese handset vendors (except fo Sony) couldn't find the scale it needed. 



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