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Tom Murphy
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Crash Sensor
Tom Murphy   7/24/2013 1:17:20 PM
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As an avid cyclist who's had the misfortune of crashing a few times (most avid cyclists do, which is why cycling is the most dangerous sport), I have to wonder about the need for a crash sensor.  I know when I crash, as do people around me. Do I want to alert the authorities when I go down? Not generally, and in the exceptions, some bystanders were kind enough to summon help.  Then when would this be handy? I suppose for a mountain biker on a remote trail or a hiker deep in some sparesly populated wilderness -- but what would pick up the signal there? 

I DO, however, like this device as a tool to monitor elders who live alone. Falling is a major cause of injury and death among the elderly, some of whom may lie on the floor without help for hours or days. LifeAlert -- that button associated with "I've fallen and I can't get up" -- is a popular product for that reason. It's great, as long as the elder is conscious.

Can anyone think of situations where this crash sensor would be more effective?

kfield
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MCU cost a factor
kfield   7/24/2013 12:54:30 PM
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David - would love to see some pix from the event you attended!  You talk about the fact that it is sensor advamcements that make this movement possible, I would also say that it's also due to the rise of low-cost electronics.

rich.pell
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Re: Best idea is yet to come...
rich.pell   7/24/2013 11:16:34 AM
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Indeed, smart fabrics could be just around the corner.

prabhakar_deosthali
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Re:
prabhakar_deosthali   7/24/2013 12:58:25 AM
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Fashion for young apart, the priority of developing wearable devices in my opinion is for the use of physically challenged people- for example visually handicapped would wear such devices to guide them to walk on or cross the roads and such things.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: Best idea is yet to come...
mcgrathdylan   7/23/2013 9:20:07 PM
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Interesting take. If a shirt such as you describe does indeed become the next Air Jordan, that will really be something. But I think we are not quite there yet, personally.

Charles.Desassure
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Re: Best idea is yet to come...
Charles.Desassure   7/23/2013 8:28:10 PM
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Well, to keep it simple:  A good style shirt with built-in sensors to perform..... It all depends.  But this could be a hit among back to school college students across the Country just like the Michael Jordon shoes is in the sports market.  This is a good time to be in the fashion design business.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: Best idea is yet to come...
mcgrathdylan   7/23/2013 7:52:17 PM
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@charles-Yes, we are ready. What's the crazy and unthinkable idea? (Talk about a serious build up.)

Charles.Desassure
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Best idea is yet to come...
Charles.Desassure   7/23/2013 7:41:34 PM
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Thanks for this article.  Wearable sensors to me are like the note tablet with the pen.  Yes, I believe that wearable sensors will work in some market, and fail in others.   I love that sensors will be helpful for health monitoring.  That is great!   But you know, the most crazy and unthinkable idea for wearable sensors will be popular among the young generation within the next few years and it will sell very quickly.  Are you ready?

Tom Murphy
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But is it a good thing?
Tom Murphy   7/23/2013 4:41:38 PM
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David: You've gone a long way towards dashing my skepticism over the number 1 trillion. Congratulations on that! (I'm a Taurus and not easily convinced.)  But I'm still harboring a lot of doubts about the connection of all these divices. 

For example, it could be a good thing to hook up a lot of people to monitor their blood pressure, heart rate, sugar levels, whatever.  But it would also be good if the current medical establishment could manage to hold onto the results of my latest blood test, which it loses 20% of the time.  It would also be good if it could protect our privacy which, despite lots of federal regulations, are violated commonly (and at a high profit for the thieves).

Do we really want to live in a world where  everyone is "watched" by 250 sensors?  Would it be possible to hack through that massive network to find out just about anything about anybody?  Is that really, really a good thing? Or could we spend all that money (this won't be cheap) on food, health, and education?

rich.pell
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Re: What do you wear
rich.pell   7/23/2013 2:47:12 PM
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To be honest I don't know how many require a chest strap or not.  But it did seem that some were pictured without one.

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