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rick merritt
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What do you wear
rick merritt   7/23/2013 12:22:30 PM
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I'd love to hear from anyone actually using wearable sensors today--most of which I think are targeted at fitness these days.

Frank Eory
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CEO
Re: What do you wear
Frank Eory   7/23/2013 1:18:02 PM
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I mentioned the FitBit pedometer in my comment on your other blog. It has become a permanent part of my attire. I am also looking forward to further advances in strapless heart rate monitors that can be worn during all waking hours -- but do they all have to use the wrist watch form factor? I have a traditional chest strap + wristwatch style HRM that I only wear when deliberately exercising, but even if I could jettison the strap, I wouldn't want to wear a watch all the time.

I also look forward to advances in another realm of body sensors -- namely, body and limb motion and force sensors for the casual athlete. Olympians and professional athletes have had access to lots of sensor-based motion analysis for many years, but this technology has not yet been productized for the masses.

I am reminded of a ski racing clinic I took many years ago that included video analysis by an instructor who pointed out everything that was correct and incorrect with each skier's form, posture and movement. The problem is, the video setup only captures a brief period of time and space (a few turns on a particular course) and is lacking in hard data. It occurred to me how amazing it would be to get real force and motion data -- arms, legs, torso & head -- for a full ski run with varied terrain, and then review that with an instructor. Better yet, with automated analysis and real-time feedback, such a system could be used as a type of biofeedback system, so you could make adjustments in real time based on objective measurements of what you're doing right and what you're doing wrong. This could be applicable to casual athletes in many different sports. 

 

rich.pell
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Re: What do you wear
rich.pell   7/23/2013 2:10:38 PM
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+1 on looking forward to advances in wearable medical and fitness sensors.  I'm waiting for something more along the lines of the Scanadu Scout - claimed to be the first medical "Tricorder" - combined with the ability to monitor things like blood glucose levels and cholesterol etc.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: What do you wear
mcgrathdylan   7/23/2013 2:28:25 PM
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I think a very useful advance in heart rate monitors for sports would be getting rid of the chest strap altogether. I hate wearing those things. Can they develop sensors that are sensitive enough to monitor the heart rate at the wrist? Then the sensor could actually be in the watch itself. That I would like to see.

rich.pell
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Blogger
Re: What do you wear
rich.pell   7/23/2013 2:39:38 PM
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There are heart rate monitor watches available.  Are you looking for something different?

mcgrathdylan
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Blogger
Re: What do you wear
mcgrathdylan   7/23/2013 2:41:24 PM
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Are they capable of monitoring your heart rate without requiring a chest strap that places the sensor over the heart? If so, that is fantastic.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: What do you wear
mcgrathdylan   7/23/2013 2:42:51 PM
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Wow. OK, so I did a search and indeed you are correct. There are tons of them actually. Forgive my ignorance and thanks Rich for setting me straight. That is very good to know.

rich.pell
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Blogger
Re: What do you wear
rich.pell   7/23/2013 2:47:12 PM
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To be honest I don't know how many require a chest strap or not.  But it did seem that some were pictured without one.

Tom Murphy
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But is it a good thing?
Tom Murphy   7/23/2013 4:41:38 PM
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David: You've gone a long way towards dashing my skepticism over the number 1 trillion. Congratulations on that! (I'm a Taurus and not easily convinced.)  But I'm still harboring a lot of doubts about the connection of all these divices. 

For example, it could be a good thing to hook up a lot of people to monitor their blood pressure, heart rate, sugar levels, whatever.  But it would also be good if the current medical establishment could manage to hold onto the results of my latest blood test, which it loses 20% of the time.  It would also be good if it could protect our privacy which, despite lots of federal regulations, are violated commonly (and at a high profit for the thieves).

Do we really want to live in a world where  everyone is "watched" by 250 sensors?  Would it be possible to hack through that massive network to find out just about anything about anybody?  Is that really, really a good thing? Or could we spend all that money (this won't be cheap) on food, health, and education?

Charles.Desassure
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Manager
Best idea is yet to come...
Charles.Desassure   7/23/2013 7:41:34 PM
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Thanks for this article.  Wearable sensors to me are like the note tablet with the pen.  Yes, I believe that wearable sensors will work in some market, and fail in others.   I love that sensors will be helpful for health monitoring.  That is great!   But you know, the most crazy and unthinkable idea for wearable sensors will be popular among the young generation within the next few years and it will sell very quickly.  Are you ready?

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