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anon9303122
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Re: Tablet niche in urban environments
anon9303122   7/30/2013 1:44:50 PM
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And I use a Motorola Razr dumb phone.  Don't need anything more than that, so why pay more and carry around a clunky mini-tablet?

anon9303122
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Re: Tablet niche in urban environments
anon9303122   7/30/2013 1:42:48 PM
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You would probably be right.  In a city, a tablet might make some sense.  For me, and the kind of engineering work I do, a tablet is a toy.  I use a desk top machine most of the time at work, and when I travel, I use a laptop.

 

For me, a tablet is a solution in search of a problem.  My wife is an insurance adjuster.  For her, a tablet is a legitimate tool.  It has important features and functionality that suits her work.

KB3001
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There is place for 2 in my heart
KB3001   7/30/2013 12:55:16 PM
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I too tend use two out of three devices, usually my smartphone and laptop when I am in [working mode], and my smartphone and tablet when I am in [holiday mode].

zhgreader
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Re: I prefer laptop
zhgreader   7/30/2013 12:31:40 AM
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heard of this chip, which is call true 8 cores.

look forward to buying one.

any1
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Tablet niche in urban environments
any1   7/29/2013 4:53:32 PM
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The advantages of tablets like battery life and "instant on" have been mentioned, but most of you must not be city dwellers.  On a crowded bus, subway, or commuter train a tablet is the only way to go.  You don't have a lap for your laptop if you are standing.  You can't beat the size and weight if you carry everything in a backpack or brief case everyday and are walking any distance to work or school once you get off your bus, subway, train etc.

rich.pell
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Re: What's your use case?
rich.pell   7/29/2013 2:11:04 PM
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"...when I was a kid I am guessing we probably had about 10 channels, before we got cable. Cut to today: I'm not even sure how many channels its possible to receive..."

Reminds me of the Bruce Willis movie The Kid, where Willis is visited by his younger self (played by a child actor).  The latter, after spending a few minutes channel surfing in front of Willis' modern-day TV proclaims "Holy smokes... 99 channels and there's nothing on!"

mcgrathdylan
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Re: What's your use case?
mcgrathdylan   7/29/2013 1:58:39 PM
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@Tom- Was the person who bought your mid-80s VCR in 2001 interested in it for its VCR capabilities or as a technology relic/museum piece? Do you recall how much it fetched? It's interesting to me that soneone at that time would have wanted a 15-year old VCR with no remote.

Max The Magnificent
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Re: What's your use case?
Max The Magnificent   7/29/2013 1:56:37 PM
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@Daniel: Touch is intuitive, but for pixel-level control I need a device with a mouse...

I agree -- even on a non-touch screen my wife is happy to use the trackpad on the notepad, but I hate those things -- I'm really comfortable with a mouse in one hand and controlling my trusty <CTRL-x> shortcut keys with the other :-)

Tom Murphy
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Re: What's your use case?
Tom Murphy   7/29/2013 1:50:43 PM
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Max: My first VCR (mid 80s?) was a monstrous machine with a "remote" control that was connected with a cord. I sold it the year 2001, and have no doubt it still works wherever it is. But now the machine must be working manually only.  I just found the remote the other day in a box I hadn't opened in some time.

mcgrathdylan
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Re: What's your use case?
mcgrathdylan   7/29/2013 1:49:19 PM
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Now that is what I call an elegant solution, Max. I think that must be where you got your engineering mindset.


That's another thing that has changed so massively. You had two or three channels. I was born in the early 70s, and when I was a kid I am guessing we probably had about 10 channels, before we got cable. Cut to today: I'm not even sure how many channels its possible to receive through my comcast cable service but I know it's in the hundreds.

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As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

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