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Mohammed Hamed
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Tools
Mohammed Hamed   8/5/2013 3:09:41 PM
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Since it hasn't been mentioned here I'll mention it. Using the right "TOOLS" for the job and knowing how to use them. The difference can be hours, days, or months of troubleshooting effort.

Subra0
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Re: Detective Novels
Subra0   8/2/2013 4:22:36 AM
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Hey Susan 

People do ask me this question - infact I do ask myself the same question : how did I learn to troubleshoot ?  

Like you said - lots of hard work, hours of poring over circuit diagrams, board layouts, datasheets and probing until the final "AHAa" moment. And remorse , ofcourse, kick myself for having made the mistake in design.

Also as we get on in age, managing to recall similar problems encountered - experience isin'it ?

Subra

MeasurementBlues
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Depends on the manager
MeasurementBlues   8/1/2013 6:22:55 PM
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Some managers see troubleshooters the the people you keep around who saves the day. To others, they think if you need to troubleshoot, you messed up in the first place and that's not acceptable.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: "I would take a guess"
MeasurementBlues   8/1/2013 6:19:06 PM
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"you are showing that you are open to it not being correct,"

Hello Larry, remember me?

In some companies, the quote above is interpreted as a sign of weakness, to be avoided.

MeasurementBlues
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Re: "I would take a guess"
MeasurementBlues   8/1/2013 6:17:06 PM
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Sounds about right. the great American way.

D) You stop all development and fire all your engineers, greatly reducing costs and improving the quarter's profitability.  Wall Street rewards you with a quick up-tick in stock price.  You collect your incentive bonus tied to the stock price, cash in your stock options, and exit -- stage left -- leaving others to deal with the empty shell of a formerly great company.

Tom Murphy
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Re: "I would take a guess"
Tom Murphy   8/1/2013 2:27:44 PM
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Betajet: You've missed your calling. You belong on Wall Street! 

No doubt, there is incredible pressure on CEOs to boost short-term profit, which tends to lift their stock price.  I try to keep that in mind when I see companies like  Yahoo and Apple struggling to regain their footing in a very difficult market  as their stock price plummets.

betajet
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Re: "I would take a guess"
betajet   8/1/2013 2:18:23 PM
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D) You stop all development and fire all your engineers, greatly reducing costs and improving the quarter's profitability.  Wall Street rewards you with a quick up-tick in stock price.  You collect your incentive bonus tied to the stock price, cash in your stock options, and exit -- stage left -- leaving others to deal with the empty shell of a formerly great company.

betajet
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Mercedes abuse
betajet   8/1/2013 2:08:46 PM
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For the "best abuse of a Mercedes in a motion picture", I heartily recommend The Driver (Walter Hill, 1978) starring Ryan O'Neal as the title character, who is the best get-away driver in the business, and Bruce Dern as the detective obsessed with catching him.


See it on the biggest wide screen you can find.

Greybeard1
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Learning to troubleshoot
Greybeard1   8/1/2013 1:25:32 PM
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From what I've seen, engineers aren't trained to troublshoot, we're trained to design. 

While obtaining my BSEE, I remember being the 'whiz kid' in engineering labs. My labs were done first, usually worked, and I was willing to help others get theirs going.  Why could I do that?  Because I learned troubleshooting as an electronics tech in the Coast Guard, and honed it on remote stations where replacement parts could be days away.   The longer it took, the more risk to the public (no pressure at all...)It doesn't apply as well in production/design, but learning how to diagnose and repair a problem when you have limited time and resources makes you good at it.

If you want to learn troubleshooting - hang out with field repair techs, especially in-house at small repair shops.  Hospital Biomed techs are especially good at it; diagnosing and repairing an XRay machine with the Radiologist breathing down your neck and patients backing up is very much trial by fire.

 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: "I would take a guess"
Max The Magnificent   7/31/2013 10:56:17 AM
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@Larry: I'm glad that you got the job.

Me too -- it was one of the best things that could have happened. After I left university I got a job at International Computers Limited (ICL) -- I learned a lot there, and my mother could see a long term career for me (in her mind ending with me as CEO) -- but after a year two managers left to form their own start-up company -- and this was the interview I was talking about.

I was number 6 in -- I arrived the day after the desks and chairs, so the other 5 said I was a lucky b*****d person -- I always sort of thought of myself as a "junior member" because there were others before me ... I didn't really pay much attention to the way in which the company was growing .. when I left I think there were 100+ people there and someone said "you can't leave, you're the old man of the company" ... it wa sonlt then that I realized that to the 95+ who came after me I was pretty much part of the establishment

It's funny how we see ourselves and how others see us :-)

PS On re-reading the above I remember what I meant to say -- when my mother heard I was leaving ICL to join a small startup she was disgruntled to say the least and fought it tooth and nail .... now she says it was the best thing she ever advised me to do LOL

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