Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
MikeSantarini
User Rank
Author
Re: Turning software engineers into hardware engineers?
MikeSantarini   7/31/2013 2:31:10 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think the point is turning software engineers into HW engineers--it's team productivity, TTM, etc. In related news for HW engineers, Xcell Journal 84 includes an indepenant benchmark of HLS submitted by Xcell readers in France: "Benchmark: Vivado's ESL Capabilities Speed IP Design on Zynq SoC." (knock on wood) We get a large percentage of our content for each issue out of the blue submitted by Xcell readers. This is a great feature with real numbers as well as lowdown on the good, bad and the not so ugly of HLS vs RTL. The bottomline is a huge productivity boost for HW engineers. Most commercial EDA ESL tools are a capital investment and reserved for the elite in IC design, HLS IMHO brings ESL to the masses. What's more it was the best of class of those Elite ESL tools, which is why Xilinx acquired it and refined it. At any rate here is the link http://issuu.com/xcelljournal/docs/xcell_journal_issue_84/34?e=2232228/4052461

Frank Eory
User Rank
Author
Turning software engineers into hardware engineers?
Frank Eory   7/29/2013 5:06:20 PM
NO RATINGS
HLS source code is usually C++ or System C, and the applications where HLS works best are DSP applications, so on the surface, it seems logical that one would want to train the DSP software engineers in HLS.


But learning a tool is only a small step on a long journey. The end result of HLS is still a piece of hardware -- a large, complex digital logic design -- and just as with RTL design, the quality of the source code in HLS strongly influences the quality of results -- area, performance and power dissipation. An understanding of hardware and an understanding of how different source code constructs map differently into RTL and ultimately into logic gates will help a great deal in getting optimal results from HLS.

I'm not suggesting that software engineers can't learn to become hardware engineers, but rather that they actually should become hardware engineers if they want to successfully use HLS to create hardware.

kfield
User Rank
Author
Great concept
kfield   7/27/2013 1:49:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Wow, what a great concept to execute on once engineers identifed a need within the engineering community. I wonder how much input from that initial group of engineers went into the guide? I read an interesting article recently arguing that the best teachers of anything are the people who most recently learned the material -- once your expertise grows, you tend to forget what is was like at the beginning and what questions and challenges you had.



Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Radio
NEXT UPCOMING BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Are the design challenges the same as with embedded systems, but with a little developer- and IT-skills added in? What do engineers need to know? Rick Merritt talks with two experts about the tools and best options for designing IoT devices in 2016. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...