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rick merritt
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SoCal and NorCal
rick merritt   7/29/2013 1:25:20 PM
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It's not just Hollywood writing nice big checks to hard drive makers these days. Intel said recently that most of the multi-billion-dollar boom in cold storage for big data centers for folks like Facebok and Google is going to hard drives.

Much of it to hold all the personal pictures i post ;-)

Susan Rambo
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Re: SoCal and NorCal
Susan Rambo   7/29/2013 3:33:21 PM
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Thanks for the story, Rick. It will be exciting to see what happens with this in the near future. From the report: "The single biggest application (by storage capacity) for digital storage in the next several years as well as one of the most challenging is the digital conversion of film, video tape and other analog formats" I hope this means more archival film content will be preserved and available to the public, as long as there is the will (and money) to preserve older content.

tcoughlin951
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Re: SoCal and NorCal
tcoughlin951   7/29/2013 11:07:10 PM
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Susan, that is indeed the biggest single driver of storage growth.  There are vast amounts of analog content that will vanish if they are converted into digital formats as the media they are stored on ages.  However, both the costs of conversion and the costs to retain digital content for the long term are going down.  In fact from my calculations about 40% of the cost of storing 1 PB for 20 years will be in the first year as the costs of storage decrease with time.  Hopefully this will encourage the conversion and preservation of more digital content and our cultural, historical and personal heritage.

Susan Rambo
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Re: SoCal and NorCal
Susan Rambo   7/29/2013 11:15:32 PM
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@tcoughlin951, thanks for your message. It's good to hear that storage costs will do down so dramatically. Now is the time to start preserving this stuff. 

jeffreyrdiamond
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How petabytes?
jeffreyrdiamond   8/1/2013 10:17:37 PM
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Where does the notion of a movie taking petabytes of storage (up to exabytes) come from?

Let's *over assume* on everything here:  Assume no compression of any kind, not even lossless.  But assume the video utterly dominates storage compared to audio tracks:

8K x 4K frame = 32 megapixels x 2 for 3D = 64 megapixels/frame

Deep color (48-bits) => 384 megabytes/frame

60 fps = 22.5 gigabytes/second (that's amazing bandwidth!)

= 1.35 terabytes/minute

Assume a 2.5 hour block buster movie = 150 minutes = 200 terabytes.

 

And that's 8K x 4K.  More typical movies are 4K x 2.5K, 24-bit color, 24 fps, etc, etc.

So we can't even come close to one petabyte with movies of far higher fidelity than today, and an exabyte is 1,000 petabytes.

Meanwhile, Moore's Law for hard drives is just about over.  Hard drive capacity has barely increased by 30% in 5 years, and the price per terabyte has actually gone up from $30 in 2008 to $70 now.

I just don't get where these numbers come from in this article...

 

KB3001
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Re: How petabytes?
KB3001   8/1/2013 11:43:48 PM
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@Jeffreyrdiamond, I believe the article is referring to the storage requirement of the "industry" not that of end consumers. So you have to multiply he figure you have by at least 1000's of movies and 100's of distributors, which gives you the Petabytes and Exabytes requirements.

jeffreyrdiamond
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Re: How petabytes?
jeffreyrdiamond   8/2/2013 2:42:23 PM
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Ah, OK.  That makes sense.  Thanks for clarifying. :)

- Jeff



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