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Max The Magnificent
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Re: Signal Corps Wire Recorder
Max The Magnificent   8/7/2013 10:12:43 AM
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@luceleaf: In the summer of 1953 I received a one month appointment as an Engineering Aid...


Hi David -- thank you for sharing this story -- I must admit I hadn't considered either of these problems (untangling the wire and the read head seeing the other side of the wire to the write head).

Having said this, I think the concept of the wire recorder is really clever and it makes a lot of sense ... all the way up to someone working out how to fabricate good magnetic tape :-)

Susan Rambo
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Re: The isle is full of noises
Susan Rambo   8/7/2013 10:11:19 AM
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Luckily she lives a couple states away from me. Thanks for the warning. 

Max The Magnificent
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Re: The isle is full of noises
Max The Magnificent   8/7/2013 10:09:29 AM
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@Susan: Put wheels on this recorder and it would be a smart car.

By some strange quirk of fate, my 83-year-old mothe rjust bought herself a Smart Car ... be afraid ... be very afraid ... :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: try a switching amplifier to drive the record head
Max The Magnificent   8/7/2013 10:06:19 AM
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@kendallcp: When (not if, Max!) this gets published in EET...

I am quivering in anticipation myself ... as soon as Jim finishes thsi project and writes it ut, you can bet I'll be writing about it here on EE Times!!!

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Be Prepared
Max The Magnificent   8/7/2013 10:03:50 AM
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@betajet: Batman: I like to think it's because... our hearts are pure.

LOL It was so sappy -- I loved it as a kid. I remember whenever the Riddler created a riddle and they solved it and the solutuion was so wild and wacky ("... and what eats an unripe banana at three o'clock in the afternoon Robin...") but it all seemed to make perfect sense when you were a kid... you just thought they were really clever to sort out the clues :-)

Max The Magnificent
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Re: Plated why a memory?
Max The Magnificent   8/7/2013 10:00:38 AM
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@betajet: It was usually called plated wire memory and was used by the Univac 1100 series and other computers.

It amazes me how much arcane knowledge we have between all of us... It would be such a shame to lose it all ... which leads us right back to my Are We Losing the Secrets of the Masters? column (LOL)

Navelpluis
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CEO
Miniature wire recorders
Navelpluis   8/4/2013 5:30:43 AM
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Lots of security agencies used wire recorders during spy activities. There was a brand in Austria creating extremely small types of wire recorders, called 'Miniphone'. Have a look at our website http://www.cryptomuseum.com/covert/minifon/mi51/index.htm to see one of those Miniphone recorders and also note the wrist-watch where a microphone is hidden inside. There was once a spy captured on an airport. Because he wore 2 watches, since this watch was not able to run on time (no watch mechanics inside this silly thing ;-)

Other examples are wire recorders to record in flight information. The Russians had a beautiful designed tiny wire recorder in their MIG airplanes. One advantage is that wire can withold high temperatures. the 'pack of wires' isolate those inside the 'pack', hence, big chance of signals recovery once a plane has been crashed...

Anyway, lots of excamples to be found and big fun to play with.

luceleaf
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Signal Corps Wire Recorder
luceleaf   8/3/2013 7:39:00 PM
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In the summer of 1953 I received a one month appointment as an Engineering Aid (GS-4, $3175.00 per annum) at one of the three Signal Corps Engineering Labs at Fort Monmouth, NJ following Signal Corps ROTC Summer Camp at Camp Gordon GA. My assignment was to run tests on a prototype wire recorder for field use built by General Electric. The wire was very springy like piano wire and had a tendancy to pop off the spools. If you had the missfortune to drop a spool, it took an hour or more to untangle and rewind the wire, not something that could  be done in the field. The other problem I recall had to do with the variation in read signal as the wire twisted and the read head saw the side of the wire the record head had seen and then the other side.

A tape recorder was being evaluate at the same time and was vastly superior. In fact the wire recorder had already been rejected. In retrospect that may be reason I was given this task. Nevertheless it was a good experiance.

Davd W. Luce

Tom Murphy
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Re: The isle is full of noises
Tom Murphy   8/1/2013 9:52:11 PM
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Susan: ROTFLMAO!

Susan Rambo
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Re: The isle is full of noises
Susan Rambo   8/1/2013 8:58:02 PM
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@Max, Put wheels on this recorder and it would be a smart car.

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