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Henry Nurser
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Re: Backhaul?
Henry Nurser   8/5/2013 6:52:41 AM
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To answer two more recent posts/questions.

- Yes - we have a lot of interest in this application of our technology

- 60GHz does not penetrate walls

H

cheap web hosting
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60 GHZ Wifi
cheap web hosting   8/4/2013 7:42:10 PM
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I am still quite uncertain and skeptical about wireless medium growth. As WIMAX lost its popularity very soon , now LTE is under disucussion. however 60GHZ backhaul really means soemthings ot me. 

LarryM99
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Re: Backhaul?
LarryM99   8/2/2013 12:20:13 PM
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OK, that makes more sense. What I have heard described previously was a range of a few meters. It sounds like it is not going to show up on mountaintop-to-mountaintop applications, but more so in femtocell interconnectivity.

How is the penetration? How does it compare to wifi at penetrating structures, walls, etc?

JanineLove
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Re: Backhaul?
JanineLove   8/2/2013 12:14:53 PM
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Thanks for clarfying Henry. Any customers interested in this application of your technolgoy?

Henry Nurser
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Re: Backhaul?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:35:19 AM
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Janine,

Oxygen absorption restricts practical range to ~1km for low cost backhaul applications, but when dealing with smallcells (designed to improve coverage for 4G networks), and combined with the directional nature of the technology, this is in fact an advantage as it allows freq re-use.

Analogous to the 'in room' PAN role of WiGig

H

Henry Nurser
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Re: WiGig taking off?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:29:35 AM
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Rick,

Probably worth a chat sometime in the near future

Even in the 'mature' .11bgn/ac space a number of System IP companies are helping other fabless/ODM will access to WiFi technology. We also see this model applying to the .11ad market - and the baseband's design constraints are very different.  

Hence we are in no rush to be acquired - although if someone were to offer $1B I would find it difficult to refuse!

regards

H

JanineLove
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Re: Backhaul?
JanineLove   8/2/2013 11:24:24 AM
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My understanding of fixed microwave backhaul is that it can go about 50 miles point to point. Is that possible with 60GHz as well?

Henry Nurser
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Re: Backhaul?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:20:08 AM
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Perhaps the best recent analysis I have seen on the various technologies for small cell backhaul is that put together by the Small Cell forum. This can be found at http://www.scf.io/en/documents/100_Small_Cell_Forum_release_structure_and_roadmap.php

This dicusses the pros/cons of the various technologies.

BWT has several key USPs that make 60GHz even more compelling. Bit difficult to expand fully via this comment section + some 'secret sauce' that we can expose under NDA.

Peter Clarke
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Re: Backhaul?
Peter Clarke   8/2/2013 5:50:51 AM
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Well Henry or somone else at BWT would probably be best placed to describe this.

 

BUT my understanding is that 4G tends to get deployed as a large number of small cells at somewhere like an airport and you need to aggregate all the traffic through the small cell basestations and send it up/down the line.

60-GHz carrier using similar but not necessariy identical comminications protocols to WiFi is being used to do this. Because the cells are small and close packd the distances are not enormous.

 

LarryM99
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Backhaul?
LarryM99   8/1/2013 7:22:47 PM
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I have been following the evolution of 60 GHz technology and I am glad to see it close to escaping from the labs, but I am a little confused by the description of it as a backhaul technology. Most of what I have seen described as far as applications has been very short range and in the consumer space. How is this applicable to cellular or other backhaul?

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