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junko.yoshida
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WiGig taking off?
junko.yoshida   8/1/2013 8:57:29 AM
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A startup fabless chip vendor changing its business model to become an IP company is usually never a good sign. But judging from the funding Blu Wireless is getting, WiGig may be finally getting interesting...

Henry Nurser
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Re: WiGig taking off?
Henry Nurser   8/1/2013 12:51:02 PM
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Junko, thanks for your comments – based on current customer feedback we definitely see the demand for 60GHz technology as accelerating now.

Note that we 'pivoted' our business plan from fabless to System IP early last year when we realised that our unique Intellectual Property related to our HYDRA baseband architecture and wireless system expertise. Once the decision was made we were then able to quickly engage revenue generating customers – which has allowed us to bootstrap BWT's growth over the last 12months in a very cost effective way.  We see this as an example of an 'extreme-lean' startup model designed for the semi-conductor funding environment of the last few years.

We have several further interesting developments that will become public over the coming month so very open to having a chat later this month.

rick merritt
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Re: WiGig taking off?
rick merritt   8/1/2013 1:56:50 PM
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Hi Henry and thanks for weighing in.

We've been watching the rise of 60 GHz for sometime. I know several folks are on the hunt for tri-band as the next big leap in I guess a sort of merged Wi-Fi and PAN.

I can't help wondering if this market will be quickly dominated by the few big Wi-Fi/BT players such as Broadcom, Qualcomm, Marvell.


In that scenario your move makes sense. Better position yourself for a possible acquisition for one of those companies (or Synopsys or ARM or someone), than try to duke it out with your own 60 GHz chips versus their highly integrated devcies.

Is that the plan?

LarryM99
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Backhaul?
LarryM99   8/1/2013 7:22:47 PM
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I have been following the evolution of 60 GHz technology and I am glad to see it close to escaping from the labs, but I am a little confused by the description of it as a backhaul technology. Most of what I have seen described as far as applications has been very short range and in the consumer space. How is this applicable to cellular or other backhaul?

Peter Clarke
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Re: Backhaul?
Peter Clarke   8/2/2013 5:50:51 AM
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Well Henry or somone else at BWT would probably be best placed to describe this.

 

BUT my understanding is that 4G tends to get deployed as a large number of small cells at somewhere like an airport and you need to aggregate all the traffic through the small cell basestations and send it up/down the line.

60-GHz carrier using similar but not necessariy identical comminications protocols to WiFi is being used to do this. Because the cells are small and close packd the distances are not enormous.

 

Henry Nurser
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Re: Backhaul?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:20:08 AM
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Perhaps the best recent analysis I have seen on the various technologies for small cell backhaul is that put together by the Small Cell forum. This can be found at http://www.scf.io/en/documents/100_Small_Cell_Forum_release_structure_and_roadmap.php

This dicusses the pros/cons of the various technologies.

BWT has several key USPs that make 60GHz even more compelling. Bit difficult to expand fully via this comment section + some 'secret sauce' that we can expose under NDA.

JanineLove
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Re: Backhaul?
JanineLove   8/2/2013 11:24:24 AM
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My understanding of fixed microwave backhaul is that it can go about 50 miles point to point. Is that possible with 60GHz as well?

Henry Nurser
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Re: WiGig taking off?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:29:35 AM
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Rick,

Probably worth a chat sometime in the near future

Even in the 'mature' .11bgn/ac space a number of System IP companies are helping other fabless/ODM will access to WiFi technology. We also see this model applying to the .11ad market - and the baseband's design constraints are very different.  

Hence we are in no rush to be acquired - although if someone were to offer $1B I would find it difficult to refuse!

regards

H

Henry Nurser
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Re: Backhaul?
Henry Nurser   8/2/2013 11:35:19 AM
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Janine,

Oxygen absorption restricts practical range to ~1km for low cost backhaul applications, but when dealing with smallcells (designed to improve coverage for 4G networks), and combined with the directional nature of the technology, this is in fact an advantage as it allows freq re-use.

Analogous to the 'in room' PAN role of WiGig

H

JanineLove
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Re: Backhaul?
JanineLove   8/2/2013 12:14:53 PM
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Thanks for clarfying Henry. Any customers interested in this application of your technolgoy?

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