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rick merritt
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Industrial Internet
rick merritt   8/1/2013 8:21:57 PM
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That's the new tagline of the day--and I think it describes a world of things that are really happening and will be the next big drivers in this old and sometimes slow moving sector.

The underpinnings are already falling into place:
2013-06-03Ethernet preps for real-time role in cars, factories
Love the pix!


CMathas
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Re: Industrial Internet
CMathas   8/2/2013 9:00:16 AM
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Thanks Rick, so where what date would I give it? I loved the photo too. In geologic time, all of this was so recent. In cyper-time, eons ago.

 

kfield
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Internal Combustion Engine
kfield   8/2/2013 11:02:28 AM
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As a mechanical engineer, I can't help but vote for the internal combustion engine. its longevity and the fact that is has not yet been replaced in the automobile underscores its importance in the history of engineering. 

rich.pell
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Re: Industrial Internet
rich.pell   8/2/2013 11:28:00 AM
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"...so where what date would I give it? I loved the photo too."

The picture is apparently that of the Model A Duesenberg chassis assembly area.  According to Wikipedia, the Model A Duesenberg was produced from 1921-1927.

Tom Murphy
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Tough Choice!
Tom Murphy   8/2/2013 11:54:00 AM
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This is a tough one....

Farraday's motor drives most factories.

The internal combustion engine facilitated transportion and construction.

Edison's electric light allowed production around the clock.

Whitney's interchangeable parts were the start of standardization.

And Ford's assembly line gave birth to modern manufacturing.

Not on the list: The introduction of the World Wide Web browser Mosaic in 1994, which opened up the Internet for billions of people and businesses.

 

...hmmm....I'd give a narrow edge to the motor. But could be persuaded to change my vote.  What do others think?

 

 

CMathas
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Re: Tough Choice!
CMathas   8/5/2013 5:59:22 PM
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I'm with you on the motor! Thanks for responding.

David Ashton
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CNC Machining?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 8:23:03 PM
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You mention CAD/CAM but CNC (Computer Numerical Control) Lathes / Machining I think deserve a specific mention (well Robot arms got one?).    They enabled mass production of tight tolerance machined components.   I think 1960s - there were earlier machines that used paper tape etc, but 60's / 70s would be when they came to be mainstream?

CMathas
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Re: CNC Machining?
CMathas   8/5/2013 9:04:07 PM
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You're right David. That is an important addition. A few days ago, my machinst son (also a David) was working on an NC when some sort of bar came loose and hit him in the head knocking him out cold and causing a concussion. He's better (except tingling in fingers) but was one lucky guy - it came close to taking out his eye--the one htat's a deep purple and black now.

David Ashton
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Re: CNC Machining?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 9:29:25 PM
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Ouch!  All the best for his recovery.  A big lathe has a lot of power in it.  Were there any safety improvements made as a result?

I've done a little lathe work - not professionally - but I think the lathe is the microprocessor of the mechanical world.  What you can do with one is limited only by your imagination.

David Ashton
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Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 9:44:03 PM
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And don't forget the water wheel - probably the first use of power for industrial processes.  Pretty limited, and the need for more power was probably the main driver for the industiral revolution,   But they were used, apparently from the Greeks onwards, for power for mines, mills and other things.

I guess you may not want to include them on the basis that they pre-dated the industrial revolution, but I'd be inclined to put them in as the start of the whole timeline?

I saw a program on TV the other night about a guy who bought an old mill building and used the water race to power a generator which powered his house and then fed some back into the grid.  So water power is not dead yet!

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