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rick merritt
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Industrial Internet
rick merritt   8/1/2013 8:21:57 PM
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That's the new tagline of the day--and I think it describes a world of things that are really happening and will be the next big drivers in this old and sometimes slow moving sector.

The underpinnings are already falling into place:
2013-06-03Ethernet preps for real-time role in cars, factories
Love the pix!


CMathas
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Re: Industrial Internet
CMathas   8/2/2013 9:00:16 AM
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Thanks Rick, so where what date would I give it? I loved the photo too. In geologic time, all of this was so recent. In cyper-time, eons ago.

 

rich.pell
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Re: Industrial Internet
rich.pell   8/2/2013 11:28:00 AM
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"...so where what date would I give it? I loved the photo too."

The picture is apparently that of the Model A Duesenberg chassis assembly area.  According to Wikipedia, the Model A Duesenberg was produced from 1921-1927.

kfield
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Internal Combustion Engine
kfield   8/2/2013 11:02:28 AM
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As a mechanical engineer, I can't help but vote for the internal combustion engine. its longevity and the fact that is has not yet been replaced in the automobile underscores its importance in the history of engineering. 

Caleb Kraft
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Re: Internal Combustion Engine
Caleb Kraft   8/7/2013 6:09:18 PM
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This is always kind of stunning to me. With the advancements we've made in so many other areas, it is blows my mind that the combustion engine is still basically the same. We've made it much much more efficient, but that's about it. You'd think we would all be driving electric cars around by now!

Tom Murphy
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Tough Choice!
Tom Murphy   8/2/2013 11:54:00 AM
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This is a tough one....

Farraday's motor drives most factories.

The internal combustion engine facilitated transportion and construction.

Edison's electric light allowed production around the clock.

Whitney's interchangeable parts were the start of standardization.

And Ford's assembly line gave birth to modern manufacturing.

Not on the list: The introduction of the World Wide Web browser Mosaic in 1994, which opened up the Internet for billions of people and businesses.

 

...hmmm....I'd give a narrow edge to the motor. But could be persuaded to change my vote.  What do others think?

 

 

CMathas
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Re: Tough Choice!
CMathas   8/5/2013 5:59:22 PM
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I'm with you on the motor! Thanks for responding.

David Ashton
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CNC Machining?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 8:23:03 PM
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You mention CAD/CAM but CNC (Computer Numerical Control) Lathes / Machining I think deserve a specific mention (well Robot arms got one?).    They enabled mass production of tight tolerance machined components.   I think 1960s - there were earlier machines that used paper tape etc, but 60's / 70s would be when they came to be mainstream?

CMathas
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Re: CNC Machining?
CMathas   8/5/2013 9:04:07 PM
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You're right David. That is an important addition. A few days ago, my machinst son (also a David) was working on an NC when some sort of bar came loose and hit him in the head knocking him out cold and causing a concussion. He's better (except tingling in fingers) but was one lucky guy - it came close to taking out his eye--the one htat's a deep purple and black now.

David Ashton
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Re: CNC Machining?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 9:29:25 PM
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Ouch!  All the best for his recovery.  A big lathe has a lot of power in it.  Were there any safety improvements made as a result?

I've done a little lathe work - not professionally - but I think the lathe is the microprocessor of the mechanical world.  What you can do with one is limited only by your imagination.

CMathas
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Re: CNC Machining?
CMathas   8/5/2013 9:51:55 PM
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It just happened at the end of last week. Not sure what the company has done so far, but I would imagine it's something they would rather not repeat. Thanks for your well wishes.

David Ashton
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Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 9:44:03 PM
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And don't forget the water wheel - probably the first use of power for industrial processes.  Pretty limited, and the need for more power was probably the main driver for the industiral revolution,   But they were used, apparently from the Greeks onwards, for power for mines, mills and other things.

I guess you may not want to include them on the basis that they pre-dated the industrial revolution, but I'd be inclined to put them in as the start of the whole timeline?

I saw a program on TV the other night about a guy who bought an old mill building and used the water race to power a generator which powered his house and then fed some back into the grid.  So water power is not dead yet!

CMathas
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Re: Water wheel?
CMathas   8/5/2013 9:53:49 PM
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I think that's fair - to put it at the front. That's pretty cool, powering his house. I live near a pretty active stream and was told to do the same thing. Hmmmm.

David Ashton
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Re: Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/5/2013 10:12:59 PM
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Carolyn it was on a BBC series called "Escape to the Country".  They had a compilation about people using industrial buildings and I think it was in this one:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b015r74j

but it's not available for viewing unfortunately, nor is it on the aussie channel I saw it on.   But you might find it somewhere.  As I recall the guy had solar as well, but obviously water is great, its 24/7 unless there is a drought....

CMathas
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Re: Water wheel?
CMathas   8/6/2013 4:45:00 PM
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thanks, I'll find it!

 

David Ashton
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Re: Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/6/2013 4:58:48 PM
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Carolyn sorry, I think I am leading you on a wild goose chase here.  My wife reminded me that it was not ETTC but another program where a guy walks around exploring aspects of Britain.   In this case he was exploring the roots of the industrial revolution.   Neither of us can remember what channel it was on which does not help.   I'll see if I can find some more and let you know, but don't waste time trying to find it at the moment.....

David Ashton
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Re: Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/6/2013 5:09:26 PM
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@Carolyn - Got it!

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/walking-through-history/4od#3534089

However it won't play for me - says "this service is currently not available in your area"  (read: Get lost, you Aussie Git!  :-)

You might have more luck....

CMathas
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Re: Water wheel?
CMathas   8/6/2013 6:39:37 PM
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thanks, I'll let you know!

 

David Ashton
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Re: Water wheel?
David Ashton   8/8/2013 5:48:59 AM
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Hi again Carolyn.   I found a place to watch the "Walking through History" episode about the Industrial Revolution here

http://www.sbs.com.au/ondemand/video/37163075692/Walking-Through-History-The-Birth-Of-Industry

Though it may restrict you if you're outside Australia.   If not, it's worth a watch BUT it does not have the water generator bit that I thought it did.  So I am back to thinking that it WAS in the Escape to the Country episode above.  And try as I might I cannot find anywhere that will let me watch that.

Sorry for the confusion, and maybe you'll be able to watch that episode somehow.

CMathas
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Re: Water wheel?
CMathas   8/8/2013 8:51:26 AM
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I want to watch it and will look at both of these. I've been deadline-laden over the past few days so tomorrow is it. Thanks for going to so much trouble to find it for me. I'll let you know.



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