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sixscrews
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CEO
The Olde Books and Dover
sixscrews   9/9/2013 11:40:17 AM
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Speaking of Dover - one of my favorite Dovers is 'The Kinematics of Machinery' by Franz Reuleaux, translated by Alexander B.W.Kennedy, C.E.

This is a 1963 reprint of a book first published in 1878. The original was written in German and appeared in 1875. The brief delay between the German and English versions is an indication of how important this work was to the world of 1875-78.

The copy I have was purchased in 1974 at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Bookstore and has been on my shelf through my career. My original machine design courses could have been taken from the first few chapters - crank trains, four bar linkages and all the rest.

I have spent a lot of time browsing through the book - amazing how many of the mechanical details of devices we use today were worked out in the 19th century. And they were useful for my own work, especially as they were hard for patent trolls to challenge them. If something was in Reuleaux it was prior art, no questions asked. I settled a few arguments with the USPTO using citations from M. Reuleaux.

 

EhJude0
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Freelancer
Thought provoking as usual
EhJude0   9/4/2013 4:53:02 PM
Great article Max. I've been reading EE Times for a while and just wanted to say that you guys always get my mind engaged with really thought provoking discussions. In the days of mass media Miley Cyrus filler stories, it's refreshing to see you write with insight about things that are interesting, yet also still accessible without having a lot of background in a particular area. And i'd say i'm not the only one who thinks this way, because there's always a pretty good discussion in the comments. Anyways I just wanted to say thanks, you guys are like TED talks for articles!

Frank Karkota
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Rookie
Re: Even in electronics
Frank Karkota   9/1/2013 1:23:38 PM
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@antedeluvian regarding your data sheets.

If they are not under copywrite, you can submit them to achive.org for all posterity!

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: smart meter
Max The Magnificent   8/14/2013 8:48:09 AM
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@fatemeh: ...I have a project to do and I need your help...

I will make this my #1 priority ... right after I finish all of my own projects LOL

I'm sorry to make fun of you, but did you actually read the contents of this column? If so, what on earth made you think that your comment was appropriate in the context of the discussions associated with the column?

fatemeh_halim
User Rank
Rookie
smart meter
fatemeh_halim   8/14/2013 1:26:31 AM
Dear 

I am writing this letter to introduce my self , I am a student in Master networking computer ,

I have a project to do and I need your help . If possible just I need some information related to my project .I tried to find paper related to my project subject but still I did not find any paper , Please Please help me and send me paper related to this subject .

 

My project is 

Formulation of a model for measuring the costs of security and privacy breach in smart meter deployment 

 

And I must answer the Qustion 

1 - what are the type of security and privacy breach that can occur on smart meter ? 

2- how can the security and privacy breach on smart meter cause loss of money to the power company as well as to the users? 

3- what is the monetary cost of particular security or privacy breach of smart meter ?

4-To identify the type of security and privacy  breach that can occur on smart meter .
5-To measure the monetary  cost of various types of security and privacy breach.
6-To formulation a model that can assist in measuring cost of security and privacy breach on smart meter .
7-To validate the applicability of the developed model .

 I hope you can help me in my project ,

Best regards

Email addres : m_f20033@yahoo.com

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Applications and media are changing so fast...
Max The Magnificent   8/12/2013 10:49:08 AM
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@cefischer: I can't await to get my hands dirty! :)


I was thinking about building some of the 507 movements ... and then I started to think that thsi might be the right time to invest in a small (cheap-and-cheerful) 3D printer...

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Applications and media are changing so fast...
Max The Magnificent   8/12/2013 10:46:16 AM
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@DMcCunney: I've seen the Animated Engines site -- very clever -- currently there don;t seem to be many animations on the 507Movements.com site, but there are a few -- I'm looking forward to seeing them develop more over time.

cefischer
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Applications and media are changing so fast...
cefischer   8/11/2013 7:14:58 AM
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@Max: ...even thought it's availbale for free download, I've ordered myself a copy of the paperback version from Amazon ... I'm thinking of re-creating a lot of these movements just for my own enjoyment ...

Yes, I will also get a printed copy for I don't like PDFs that much but it was too tempting to follow your link to take a first glance at the work. My heart beats for books and (very often) books alone. I always chase book sellers up around the world to get me copies of seldom titles no longer in print. Sometimes this is an easy thing, spending $1.95 for an old hardware reference manual or so but there are more complex cases, of course. Either way, I will get a "real" copy of the 507.

This copy I will take, by the end of this year when I have less business with my electronic affairs, disappearing in my workshop for a week or two, enjoying the very depths of this wonderful collection of ideas, exploring some clues for my telescope mount, making things real...---

I can't await to get my hands dirty! :)

cefischer
User Rank
Rookie
Re: Applications and media are changing so fast...
cefischer   8/11/2013 7:10:02 AM
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@Max: ...I come from the time where you were very aware of every byte and clock cycle used ...

Combine this with a good idea and it is poetry.

Last year I got the opportunity to show a few students how to write short programs and feed them into the processor instruction by instruction thereby watching how the registers change, the flags, and memory locations. Then they ran their programs at full speed, obviously fascinated that *they* were the ones who made the machine doing that---not a compiler. They had never got in touch with this before. Seemed they liked that assembly tune and even forgot about their smart phones for a little while. :) The potential to do things "by hand" is still there and that's good.

Fascinating this is, necessary it will become, too. It's just a guess but putting severe restrictions on a design isn't thus bad an idea and often results in astounding solutions. I think we need exploit equipment much better than we've done so far. Be aware of every byte and clock cycle whether you need do so or not and you need not take care of Moore's Law's---surely unavoidable---demise (at this early point in computer history). There are many things to find out in the software universe we haven't had the opportunity to explore well enough since the tremendously fast progress of hardware technology pulls us nearer the event horizon of its critical mass. That's like astrophysics: From a far vantage point, the nearer you come a black hole, the *slower* you'll become and the fainter your outline, until you finally seem to disappear and *stop* just before crossing the event horizon. In fact, that is from your own viewpoint, you've long be pulled *beyond* it and made your final trip into the singularity.

My studying matured hardware technology and forgotten software solutions from the early 1980ies to 90ies has often saved me from falling and it keeps doing so. Whether building discrete logical circuits, combining them with analogue features, writing programs that fit into a few bytes, or implementing one of those 507 Mechanical Movements---if we lose the knowledge how to do things like that we are lost.

This makes this column here such a precious little niche in a world full of more or less useful information.




DMcCunney
User Rank
CEO
Re: Applications and media are changing so fast...
DMcCunney   8/10/2013 10:27:49 PM
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Not just available for free download: someone has converted it to a website, and is in the process of animating some of the movements for a visual demonstration of how they work.  See http://507movements.com/

There is a companion site called Animated Engines: http://www.animatedengines.com/

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