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Sheetal.Pandey
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Re: Handling the "why" part
Sheetal.Pandey   8/7/2013 2:07:26 PM
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Ya so much more revolution are yet to come in mobile telephony, imagine you can watch all television channels, do projections to make bigger screen, home automation all through mobile...

rick merritt
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Re: Handling the "why" part
rick merritt   8/6/2013 6:33:11 PM
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Thanks for jumping into the conversation, Majeed.

junko.yoshida
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Re: Handling the "why" part
junko.yoshida   8/6/2013 9:55:44 AM
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Yes, I am really looking forward to reading the Nokia book!

Kuckoo
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Handling the "why" part
Kuckoo   8/6/2013 12:07:42 AM
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Very valuable tips, Junko. Thanks.

Though I tried to focus on the "Why" part in "Nokia's Smartphone Problem" as to project why the venerable cellphone champion couldn't handle the smartphone industry and suffered incredibly. 

junko.yoshida
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Re: "Nokia's Smartphone Probelem" a more focused acount
junko.yoshida   8/5/2013 6:11:33 PM
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Glad to hear more books are coming from you! Excellent.

As a reporter, though, in a world where things change so quickly and we all chase the newest thing, reading any tech stories (including my own) a few years ago feels so dated.

To put a historical context to any story is always welcome and necessary, but I often feel what we reporters lack is out ability to figure out "why" things happened the way they did.

Sure, reporters do well at chronicling when, where, what and how.

But "why" always seems to require us reporters to have a good amount of reflection time (and space) and more critical thinking... In that regards, the book format always wins.

rick merritt
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Re: Why "Smartphone" lacks linear coverage
rick merritt   8/5/2013 2:22:49 PM
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I'd love to see the chapter on Qualcomm and any other chip-related stuff that didn't make it into the book.

Kuckoo
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"Nokia's Smartphone Probelem" a more focused acount
Kuckoo   8/5/2013 2:17:35 PM
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Smartphone is such a diverse and multi-dimensional subject that one book can't do justice to this domain. It's now an industry on its own right. My take was to provide the big picture on this evolving juggernaut so that tech business managers and engineers can develop a greater understanding of this critical technology area in one go. 

My second book "Nokia's Smartphone Problem" is an effort to get focused and linear. Likewise, my upcoming book "Mobile Commerce 2.0" focuses on another crucial area related to smartphones. This book is expected to be launched in September this year. 

Tom Murphy
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Re: Why "Smartphone" lacks linear coverage
Tom Murphy   8/5/2013 1:10:41 PM
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Both sounds like interesting books, and I like the idea of collecting some of the milestones reported on the Internet and arranging them so that they make sense from a historical perspective.  (I've seen several other attempts to do this. My favorite wasn't about tech at all; it was an anthology of blogs about the same political topic, allowing the reader to see a controversial topic from many points of view.)    My own book, Web Rules, was a hybrid. The first half was based on my reporting on the Internet from 94-99; the second half was a collection of verbatim interviews with the likes of Andy Grove, Jerry Yang, Barry Diller, Ann Winblad, Mike Bloomberg, and others who were helping to shaping the Web during that time.  

Kuckoo
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Why "Smartphone" lacks linear coverage
Kuckoo   8/5/2013 12:58:07 PM
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There was simply too much to cover -- major discoveries and developments, success and failure stories, and a maze of products at the fringe of smartphones. I had to even take out some critical areas, e.g. social networks, Qualcomm's role, etc. 



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