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Kinnar
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CEO
Re: The topic is gaining its importance
Kinnar   8/13/2013 3:19:58 AM
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Yes, It was a very good source of information, SHE (Secure Hardware Extension) and EVITA, are the emerging standards for Automotive Electronic Security, and it was a very surprising to me that virtually all the electronics giants are working on it name it a few like Mentor Graphics, Toshiba, Freescale, Renesas and the list continues. 

You are right SHE enabled automotive electronics will be soon getting seen in the general automobiles.

 

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: bluetooth audio hacking I doubt it.....
junko.yoshida   8/12/2013 10:37:43 PM
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Loser99, you may change your mind if you read the following tech paper:

http://www.autosec.org/publications.html

The paper gives you answers to a lot of your skepticism.

Loser99
User Rank
Freelancer
bluetooth audio hacking I doubt it.....
Loser99   8/12/2013 4:09:36 PM
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Big deal I can hack into the sound system when the radio is tuned in with an FM transmitter and broadcast audio to their stereo.

How scientific is it to notice peoples reaction's in a car and assume you are successful?

krisi
User Rank
CEO
physical or cyber threat more important?
krisi   8/12/2013 2:18:30 PM
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Very interesting thread...which brings in my mind a key point whether cyber or physical threats are more important...when we discuss car hacking possibility it sounds worrysome...until we realize that 40,000 people annualy die in car crashes already...so even with the best technology you can get hit from behind by a teenager texting (nothing against teenagers, just an example)

przem
User Rank
Manager
Re: Duh, I can also cut the brake line.
przem   8/12/2013 12:15:21 PM
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Several years ago there was a demo of hooking into the bluetooth infrastructure on cars using directional antennas from a highway overpass (the authors injected audio into the sound system, and could visually confirm success by observing driver's reaction :)


The thinking then is that the car manufacturers could not resist introducing integrated in-vehicle networks, which opens up a possibility of a horizontal access escalation from the sound/entertainment network to the car control network. The demonstration of CAN/OBD vulnerabilities should make people think in terms of integrated, interdependent systems that need multilayer security.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: We need to get rid of glass windows in cars
junko.yoshida   8/12/2013 11:23:33 AM
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Loser99, I am sorry that you feel that way. When modern cars are equipped with so much electronics (and its content is increasing), invisible hacking inside the electronics system in a car is going to be a critical issue just as much as visible hacking via glass windows is.

Loser99
User Rank
Freelancer
We need to get rid of glass windows in cars
Loser99   8/12/2013 11:13:27 AM
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These glass windows can easily be "hacked" with a brick, enabling hackers access to the car.  I would suggest making the car like a tank and using video monitors instead of the windows.  Maybe TI's employees can work on that instead of this pointless illustration of "car security threats"

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Car security threat is more serious.
junko.yoshida   8/12/2013 10:57:50 AM
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I couldn't agree wtih you more, prabhakar. I find it, however, fascinating that expertise the chip industry has developed over time -- be it in mobile or in smartcars -- can be now applied to automotive.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: The topic is gaining its importance
junko.yoshida   8/12/2013 10:50:07 AM
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Much of the initial work on automotive security started several years ago within the automotive industry, culminating to the development of SHE (secure hardware module) spec and a framework such as EVITA, as described in the article.

We are now beginning to see electronics based on such specs and that meet with the framework.

Cars equipped with such electronics are not here yet, but they will start showing up soon.

junko.yoshida
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Hacking for fun rather than havoc
junko.yoshida   8/12/2013 10:43:54 AM
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Will that be a big concern for car companies that have never liked third-party add-ons anyway?


You are absolutely right, Larry. Carmakers have never liked third-party add-ons, and they would like to exert controls over them in any which way they can.

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